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  • A photo of Lampropeltis calligaster, the yellow-bellied kingsnake that lives in prairies west of the Mississippi
  • This is a Hubble Space Telescope image of supernova 1994D

    Science

    Detonating White Dwarfs as Supernovae

    October 4, 2016

    A new mathematical model created by astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History details a way that dead stars called white dwarfs could detonate, producing a type of explosion that is instrumental to measuring the extreme distances in our universe.

  • OpenOpenSpace
  • MEEP

    Press Release, Education

    American Museum of Natural History Internship Program Celebrates 20th Anniversary

    August 1, 2016

    This summer, while many of their peers are starting traditional, office-based internships, more than 30 local young adults will be guiding visitors through the halls of the American Museum of Natural History as part of the 20th class of the Museum Education and Employment Program (MEEP). 

  • A scorpion, Scorpio palmatus, photographed in the Negev desert in Israel.
  • RM_160317_7550
  • A photo of a barbeled dragonfish

    Science

    Bioluminescence Evolved at Least 29 Times in Marine Fishes

    June 8, 2016

    New research shows that bioluminescence—a phenomenon in which organisms generate visible light through a chemical reaction—has evolved many more times among marine fishes, and likely throughout the entire tree of life, than previously thought.

  • This model is a true-to-life sculpture of Gomek, the largest “salty” ever exhibited in the Western Hemisphere.

    Exhibitions

    CROCS: ANCIENT PREDATORS IN A MODERN WORLD AT THE AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

    June 3, 2016

    For 200 million years, crocs and their charismatic ancestors have been a tenacious presence on our planet, sometimes in forms that would seem unrecognizable next to the aquatic reptiles we know today. Featuring live species of crocs as well as fossils, life-sized models, and interactive components, the new exhibition Crocs: Ancient Predators in a Modern World at the American Museum of Natural History will explore fascinating insights about these animals’ evolutionary history, biology, behavior, and precarious relationships with humans. The exhibition will also cover the surprising ways researchers are studying crocs in ways that may benefit humans including fighting antibiotic-resistant infections, tooth renewal, and blood substitutes.

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