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Wolverine

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Canada’s Barren Lands are so far north that trees barely grow and the summer sun sets near midnight. This is prime wolverine country: cool, remote and with room to roam. Wolverines are tireless nomads, traveling many miles a day and scaling sheer slopes to find food and mates. Their strength and ferocity is legendary, but wolverines are choosy about what they attack. Caribou are hunted only when floundering in deep snow—or are scavenged after a wolf kill.

Ice Age Animals (South)

During the last ice age, vast sheets of ice extended well beyond the polar regions. By about 12,000 years ago, the ice sheets had significantly shrunk—and so had the Northern Hemisphere’s variety of large mammals. In North America, about five dozen kinds of mammals, big and small, went extinct as the ice slowly retreated.

The causes of the extinctions are still under debate. Perhaps many species could not cope with the changes to their environment. Widespread disease or a meteorite impact may have occurred. A more likely influence, however, is a predator who had arrived in North America just before the extinctions happened—humans.

Species in this diorama include the sabertooth cat, Columbian mammoth, California condor, horse, and lion.

Ice Age Animals (North)

During the last ice age, vast sheets of ice extended well beyond the polar regions. By about 12,000 years ago, the ice sheets had significantly shrunk—and so had the Northern Hemisphere’s variety of large mammals. In North America, about five dozen kinds of mammals, big and small, went extinct as the ice slowly retreated.

The causes of the extinctions are still under debate. Perhaps many species could not cope with the changes to their environment. Widespread disease or a meteorite impact may have occurred. A more likely influence, however, is a predator who had arrived in North America just before the extinctions happened—humans.

Species in this diorama include Homo sapiens, stag moose, steppe bison, and wooly mammoth. 

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