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New Dinosaur Feather Findings

Science

New Dinosaur Feather Findings

Newly discovered dinosaur implies greater prevalence of feathers; Megalosaur fossil represents first feathered dinosaur not closely related to birds.

Feathered Dinosaurs

Online Resource

Feathered Dinosaurs

Not all dinosaurs went extinct 66 million years ago. One group survived, and we see their descendants every day. We call them birds. Discover research, articles, and videos about modern birds and their extinct relatives.

Dinosaur Feathers

Dinosaur Feathers

Scientists think that many dinosaur species sported primitive feathers—precursors to those birds use to fly, court mates, and more.

Figuring Out Feathers

Article

Figuring Out Feathers

Feathers turn out to be surprisingly complicated. First, there's the question of which animals have feathers. For centuries, people thought feathers were unique to birds. Now we know this isn't true. In the last several years, paleontologists have found feathers on various species of extinct dinosaurs.

A Feathered Tyrant

Article

A Feathered Tyrant

Tyrannosaurus rex roamed North America around 66 million years ago. But a small tyrannosaur from the same family lived in the Liaoning forest. This small cousin of T. rex, Dilong paradoxus, was also a fierce predator.

New Finding: Dinosaur’s Feathers Were Black with Iridescent Sheen

Blog Post

New Finding: Dinosaur’s Feathers Were Black with Iridescent Sheen

A pigeon-sized, four-winged dinosaur known as Microraptor had black iridescent feathers when it roamed the Earth 130 million years ago, according to new research led by a team of American and Chinese scientists that includes Museum researchers. The dinosaur’s fossilized plumage is the earliest record of iridescent feather color. The findings, which suggest the importance of display in the early evolution of feathers, are published in the March 9 edition of the journal Science.

“This study gives us an unprecedented glimpse at what this animal looked like when it was alive,” said Mark Norell, one of the paper’s authors and chair of the Museum’s Division of Paleontology.

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