connections to other museum halls

Evolution

Explore the story of vertebrate evolution in the Museum's famed fourth floor fossil halls. Darwin's theory underlies our understanding of the relatedness of species demonstrated in these halls.

Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Orientation Center: Watch the video presentation on The Evolution of Vertebrates.

Halls of Saurischian Dinosaurs and Ornithischian Dinosaurs: Observe the way specimens are displayed according to their evolutionary relationships—which are determined by their shared physical characteristics—rather than chronologically.

The Lila Acheson Wallace Wing of Mammals and Their Extinct Relatives (which includes the Hall of Primitive Mammals and the Paul and Irma Milstein Hall of Advanced Mammals): Follow these Hall's dramatic tale of great diversification, sudden extinctions, and the forces behind these phenomena.

The Hall of Vertebrate Origins: Journey 500 million years back in time to see how vertebrates moved through the oceans and onto land.

Diversity of Species

Displays and dioramas throughout the museum illuminate extraordinary variety of life on Earth.

The Hall of Biodiversity: Find the beetle collection on the Spectrum of Life wall for clues to Darwin's passion for these creatures. Next to the Galàpagos Island iguana, watch a video of its relative, the marine iguana, feeding underwater.

The Milstein Hall of Ocean Life's Tree of Life:
Split between vertebrates and invertebrates, this model displays the major groups of animals that inhabit the oceans today.

Geology

Darwin drew on the fossil record to challenge the contemporary view of Earth as a young, unchanging planet.

Hall of Planet Earth: Visit the "How has Earth evolved?" section to see how the geologic record has preserved early life forms. Explore "How do we Read the Rocks?" to learn what geologic formations tell us about Earth's past.

Voyage of the Beagle

The Museum halls contain many of the animals that Darwin encountered during his five-year voyage.

Hall of Mammals and Their Extinct Relatives: Find the toxodonts, an extinct group first described by Darwin, and some of its other prehistoric relatives. Many of the notungulates on display are from the area of Argentina where Darwin unearthed fossils of giant sloths. These finds led to his understanding of descent from a common ancestor.

Birds of the World Hall: The High Andes diorama displays many of the birds that so fascinated Darwin: finches, condors, rheas and ovenbirds.

Hall of Reptiles and Amphibians: Stop at the entrance to the Darwin Exhibition to look at the Galàpagos Island Tortoise, which famously inspired Darwin's thinking on geographic variation.

South American Peoples Hall: Darwin delighted in South America's tropical beauty and its people. This Hall displays many of the cultural artifacts that gave Darwin his first and only look at how people lived outside his native England. Look for the bolas used by Patagonian gauchos, models of guanaco and other cameloids, and an early farming exhibit showing the great variety of vegetables that Darwin noted as an example of artificial selection.

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