For Educators

Beyond Planet Earth: The Future of Space Exploration offers a vision of the future of space travel as it boldly examines humanity's next steps in our solar system and beyond. This comprehensive guide will help you explore the exhibition with your students.

Educators Guide and Materials


More Resources for Educators

Use these free online resources to further explore themes presented in the Beyond Planet Earth exhibition.

To Infinity, and Beyond!

Article

To Infinity, and Beyond!

What will space travel become, and where will it take us? Take a look back at the astounding progress in space travel in modern times and a preview at the future of space travel.

Field Trip to the Moon

Student Programs, Camp

Field Trip to the Moon

Grades 5-8: Simulated voyage to the Moon in the Hayden Planetarium.

Space Shows

Space Shows

Journey into the vast reaches of space with the Museum's exciting space shows.

Space Travel Guide

Space Travel Guide

Can you convince your friends to spend the next school break on Pluto? Let your imagination run wild, and write an inspiring work of science fiction. 

Our Moon

Science Bulletin

Our Moon

The peaceful glow of the moonlight in our sky belies a violent history. Evidence suggests that the Moon formed when a Mars-sized object collided with the young Earth, and detailed computer models show us how such an impact could form our lunar companion in just one month.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science
Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of
Education at the American Museum of Natural History. This visualization
was supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA).

Impact! Tracking Near-Earth Asteroids?

Science Bulletin

Impact! Tracking Near-Earth Asteroids

Collisions between space objects are a vital part of the evolution of our Solar System. Most of Earth's impact craters have been wiped away due to plate tectonics, but evidence of such cosmic catastrophes, such as Arizona's 50,000-year-old meteor crater, do remain. When is Earth due for another major blast? Meet the professional and amateur astronomers who may be the first to know: first at LINEAR, a near-earth asteroid detection facility in New Mexico, and then at the Smithsonian's Minor Planet Center, where orbits of near-earth objects are tracked for possible hits and misses.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science
Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of
Education at the American Museum of Natural History. This visualization
was supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA).

An Interview with Mars

An Interview with Mars

Join forces with Stella Stardust to create a red-hot interview of the red planet. As Mars, you can proudly tell the world about being home to the largest volcano in the solar system.