Shortcut Navigation:
B.5.2. a meteorite family tree hero

A meteorite family tree

A meteorite family tree

  • Exhibition Text

    • Some seemingly unrelated meteorites came from the same source, or "parent body."

      Show more
  • For Educators

    • Topic: Astronomy

      Subtopic: Meteorites

      Keywords: Astrogeology, Astrophysics, Meteorites

      Audience: General

In This Section

B.5.2.2.1. Ornans

Ornans

The two meteorites below share certain features in common—they are both carbon-rich, or carbonaceous, chondrites and their oxygen-isotope signatures overlap.

B.5.2.2.2. Vigarano

Vigarano

The two meteorites below share certain features in common—they are both carbon-rich, or carbonaceous, chondrites and their oxygen-isotope signatures overlap.

B.5.2.3. Kunashak. Divided they fall

Kunashak

The meteorites Kunashak, Kyushu and Suizhou fell in three different countries—Russia, Japan and China—over a span of 100 years.

B.5.2.3. Suizhou. Divided they fall

Suizhou

The meteorites Kunashak, Kyushu and Suizhou fell in three different countries—Russia, Japan and China—over a span of 100 years.

B.5.2.3. Kyushu. Divided they fall

Kyushu

The meteorites Kunashak, Kyushu and Suizhou fell in three different countries—Russia, Japan and China—over a span of 100 years. 

B.5.2.4. Bath. A diverse family

Bath

At first glance, meteorites don't look too much alike.

B.5.2.4. Hammond Downs. A diverse family

Hammond Downs

At first glance, meteorites don't look too much alike. 

B.5.2.4.  Richardton. A diverse family

Richardton

At first glance, meteorites don't look too much alike.

American Museum of Natural History

Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192
Phone: 212-769-5100

Open daily from 10 am - 5:45 pm
except on Thanksgiving and Christmas
Maps and Directions

Enlighten Your Inbox

Stay informed about Museum news and research, events, and more!