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B.6.2. From hot to cold

From hot to cold

From hot to cold

  • Exhibition Text

    • The chemical composition of each meteorite provides clues to where its parent body resided in the solar system.

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  • For Educators

    • Topic: Astronomy

      Subtopic: Planets

      Keywords: Astrogeology, Astrophysics, Chemical elements, Meteorites, Solar system

      Audience: General

In This Section

B.6.2.1.1. Orgueil

Orgueil

Studies suggest the meteorite Orgueil might come from the core of a comet, an object made of ice, dust and rock that orbits the Sun at high speed.

B.6.2.2. Abee. An iron case?

Abee

Iron will remain in a metallic state unless it is exposed to a substance like water, which "oxidizes" the metal. 

B.6.2.3. Allende. The outer reaches

Allende (AMNH 4328)

The outer planets—Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune—formed in the coolest part of the early solar nebula, which was rich in volatile gases and ices.

 B.6.2.7 Oakley (stone). Middle of the road .jpg

Oakley (stone)

Like Renfrow (above), Melrose (right), Fisher and Wickenburg (left), Oakley (below) is an example of a meteorite that formed at an intermediate distance from the Sun (ordinary chondrites).

B.6.2.8. Melrose (A)

Melrose (A)

Like Renfrow (above), Melrose (right), Fisher and Wickenburg (left), Oakley (below) is an example of a meteorite that formed at an intermediate distance from the Sun (ordinary chondrites).

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