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Why is There One Long Day and one Long Night in Antarctica?

Investigate what causes Antarctica’s six-month summers and winters by studying day and cycles across the globe.

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Article

Living at the Pole by Paul Siple

Siple's Antarctic trips are legendary. At 10, he was selected in a nationwide Boy Scout search to travel there. Several decades later, he was part of the first group to winter over at the South Pole.

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Article

Safety and Wintering Over in Antarctica

Antarctica's winter runs from mid-February through late August. If you decide to stay, you're there for the duration—all aircraft traffic is stopped. Learn how research crews prepare to go it alone.

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Article

Day & Night Cycles

In Antarctica, the Sun never sets during the summer or rises during the winter. But do you know why? Learn the answer from a researcher who summers in the land of constant daylight.

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Classroom Activity

Seeing the Light

This simple experiment eases the task of understanding daily and seasonal cycles of day and night. See firsthand why the length of daylight changes along with your location on Earth.

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Interactive

Seasonal Cycle

If the Earth turns all the way around every 24 hours, then why are some days longer than others? And why do we have winter and summer? See the answers for yourself—in a matter of seconds.

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