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Putting Antarctica on the Map

How has our ability to map Antarctica changed in the past 100 years? Do a little exploring of your own, and see what we've learned since Roald Amundsen raced to reach the South Pole first.

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At the Pole by Roald Amundsen

As a child, Amundsen dreamed of exploring the North Pole. Yet it is his discovery of the South Pole for which he is best known. Read Amundsen's exciting account of his groundbreaking expedition.

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The Voyage of the James Caird

Just one day away from Antarctica, Shackleton's ship was crushed and destroyed. Yet his ingenuity and bravery helped save the crew. Read about his 800-mile voyage in a lifeboat to go find help.

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Antarctica's Early Explorers

The first time Manahan walked into Scott's primitive 1902 hut, still sitting out on the Antarctic ice, he couldn't help but see how similar their work was despite their very different base camps.

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Antarctic Exploration

While its existence had been predicted for thousands of years, Antarctica was the very last continent discovered. Learn about its first explorers—and the teamwork that exists there today.

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Understanding Exploration

Compass, dog sled, telephone, computer, Global Positioning System (GPS)—which of these technological advances has made the biggest contribution to Antarctic exploration? Take our research challenge.

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