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Dinosaurs: Ancient Fossils, New Discoveries

Dinosaur Teeth

Curriculum Materials

Dinosaur Teeth

When it comes to dinosaurs, teeth are the windows to these prehistoric reptiles' stomachs—and the different foods that filled them. Examine dinosaur choppers, strippers, grinders, and rippers.

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Curriculum Materials

Dinosaur Timeline

When you've been alive for less than a decade, how in the world do you grasp geologic time? Start with a 100-inch-long roll of adding machine tape and measure out Earth's past.

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Classroom Activity

Be a Trackway Detective

What can you tell from looking at a fossil record of dinosaur footprints? Everything from which dinosaur was there first to what they might have feasted on.

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Curriculum Materials

Bigger Than You Think

Not all dinosaurs were enormous like the 84-foot-long, 30-ton Apatosaurus. TheCompsognathus, for example, approximated an eight-pound chicken. Size up two others.

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Curriculum Materials

What is a Fossil?

The most common fossils are bones and teeth, but not all fossils are body parts. Explore the wide-ranging evidence of ancient life that scientists use to understand Earth's prehistoric past.

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Curriculum Materials

How Big Were Dinosaurs?

How many times would your footprint fit into that of a large dinosaur? Could all of your classmate's feet fill up the small crater? Find out with this personalized look at the 35-ton Apatosaur.

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Curriculum Materials

Grouping Dinosaurs

Dinosaurs all belong to the same group, but within that group there are many subsets—meat-eating dinosaurs, four-legged dinosaurs, and so on. Try your hand at classification with these eight dinosaur illustrations.

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Classroom Activity

Dinosaur Names

Some dinosaur names are short, while others are lengthy tongue twisters. But all are infused with meaning. Examine the linguistic roots of these terrible (deinos) lizards (sauros). 

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Article

Meet the Paleontologists: Jin Meng

Jin Meng studies the morphology, systematics, and evolution of mammals, particularly early mammals. Unlike some paleontologists who focus primarily upon teeth and dentition as their evidence, Dr. Meng examines the cranium, ear region, and enamel microstructure of teeth as sources of data to address evolutionary issues concerning mammals.

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