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Beyond Planet Earth_Sputnik_thumbnail

Back to the Start of Space Race in Beyond Planet Earth

On Exhibit posts

On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Union launched Sputnik-1, the first man-made satellite to successfully orbit the Earth, its beeping signal picked up by radio operators around the globe. Weighing in at just under 184 pounds and measuring 22.8 inches in diameter, Sputnik soared to space amid the tensions of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, creating significant political and scientific fallout. A life-sized model of the satellite, whose name means “fellow traveler” in Russian, is featured in the current exhibition Beyond Planet Earth: The Future of Space Exploration.

Tags: Hayden Planetarium, Space Exploration

19. Curiosity rover_RM.3163

Curiosity Rover Arrives on Mars to Begin Mission

On Exhibit posts

The 2,000-lb. Curiosity, NASA's most advanced rover yet, arrived safely on Mars this morning after a complex entry, descent, and landing sequence that had been described as "seven minutes of terror." 

Curiosity, a mobile laboratory that carries 10 scientific instruments, has been en route from Earth for 36 weeks. Now, it begins its two-year mission to find out whether Mars has ever supported microbial life. It sent its initial image of Mars shortly after touchdown.

Don't miss a life-sized model of Curiosity in the Museum’s exhibition Beyond Planet Earth: The Future of Space Exploration, open through Sunday, August 12.

Tags: Hayden Planetarium

18. Vampire squid_DF.3759.jpg

A Brilliant Defense

On Exhibit posts

Humans marvel at the beauty of glowing organisms, but usually, nature’s light displays serve a much more practical purpose.

When pushed to the limit by a predator, the vampire squid envelops its adversary in a smokescreen of glowing particles. After ejecting luminescent mucus from the tips of its eight tentacles, this master of disguise makes its escape, “flying” through water with its fins rather than jet-propelling like most other cephalopods. The sticky mucus, which glows for up to 10 minutes, may even coat the predator and make it more vulnerable to attack.

Tags: Members

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