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Showing blog posts tagged with "Food"

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A Historical Tour of Aphrodisiacs with Francine Segan

Q&As

In honor of the approaching Valentine’s Day, the Museum will host food historian Francine Segan on Wednesday, February 8, for Aphrodisiacs: Myth or Reality?, featuring stories and tastings of foods considered to have seductive properties throughout time. Below, Segan unravels the histories behind a few food items thought to have a strong connection to passion.

Why were oysters, scallops, mussels, and other types of seafood hailed as aphrodisiacs?

Francine Segan: Aphrodisiacs were named for Aphrodite, the goddess of love. According to ancient Greek legend, Aphrodite was born from the sea and arrived onshore transported on either an oyster or scallop shell. So oysters and all sorts of shellfish were thought to be aphrodisiacs.

Tags: Food, Q&A

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Brooklyn Brewery Brewmaster Garrett Oliver Talks Beer

News posts

Beer and cheese have long been two of America’s favorite things. On October 19, Brooklyn Brewery Brewmaster Garrett Oliver and Aaron Foster of Murray’s Cheese will lead the Museum’s Adventures in the Global Kitchen: Beer and Cheese, an exploration of how carefully crafted pairings can bring out the best in both, complete with tastings of multiple seasonal beers and cheese. Oliver, who recently edited The Oxford Companion to Beer, answered a few questions about the popular beverage.

Tags: Food

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May 11: The Buzz on Beekeeping

News posts

Entomologist Gene Kritsky, author of The Quest for the Perfect Hive: A History of Innovation in Bee Culture, will join beekeepers Richard Blohm and Carl Flatow for a discussion about urban beekeeping at this month’s Adventures in the Global Kitchen on Wednesday, May 11. He recently answered some questions about apiculture.

What is the earliest historic record of beekeeping, and where did it originate?The earliest historic record of beekeeping is from the Fifth Dynasty of Ancient Egypt.  This relief, which is in the Neues Museum in Berlin, shows the taking of honey from horizontal hives, extracting the honey from the wax, and sealing in jars.

The oldest known beehives date from 900 BCE and were found in the ancient city of Rehov in Israel.

What significant innovation vastly improved beekeeping?

The most important innovation in beekeeping was the incorporation of the “bee space” in hive design. The “bee space” is the space that is too far apart for bees to glue shut, but too narrow for them to bridge with comb. This design permitted the development of a hive with moveable frames, which led to significant increases in honey production per hive.

Tags: Food

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