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First Look: Hall of North American Mammals

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Over the last few months, an expert team of conservators and Museum artists has led the restoration of the dioramas of the Hall of North American Mammals, which first opened in 1942 and has offered generations of Museum visitors spectacular views of North America’s natural heritage. This is the first in a series of inside looks at the comprehensive restoration and conservation process, which will be completed by fall of 2012.

 

Tags: Hall of North American Mammals

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Cleared and Stained: Picturing a Ponyfish

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While advances in imaging technologies have opened new pathways for scientists to study natural phenomena, researchers continue to make remarkable discoveries using techniques that have been around for decades. John Sparks, associate curator in the Museum’s Department of Ichthyology, uses enzymes and dyes to reveal key anatomical structures in different species of fishes for study of their function and evolution.

Among his study subjects are ponyfishes (family Leiognathidae), a group of bioluminescent fishes common in the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific that have a light organ. This internal structure, which varies among ponyfish species, surrounds the esophagus and contains luminescent bacteria, the source of the fish’s light. The light organ is larger in males, which have a second species-specific anatomical feature: translucent skin patches, which allow them to use the light organ in displays to attract mates in turbid waters. (Bioluminescent organisms will be explored in the exciting new exhibition Creatures of Light: Nature’s Bioluminescence, which opens at the Museum on March 31, 2012.)

Tags: Bioluminescence

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Q and A with Author Richard Panek

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In recent years, a radically new vision of the universe has emerged: only 4 percent of it consists of the matter that makes up humans, the Museum, and every planet, star, and galaxy. The remaining 96 remains a mystery.

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Museum Collections Help Identify Four New Species of Bees in New York City

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Researchers have uncovered four new species of bees in New York City, one of which has an especially fitting name: Lasioglossum gotham. The newly described city dwellers are among 11 East Coast bees recently identified by Cornell University postdoctoral researcher Jason Gibbs in the journal Zootaxa with the help of vast digital and physical bee collections at the American Museum of Natural History.

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Nov. 30 Human Genome Panel Preview: Common Genetics Myths

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The completion of the Human Genome Project 10 years ago promised a new era of disease treatment and personalized medicine. But have these hopes been realized? On Wednesday, November 30, a panel of experts that includes geneticists, an ethicist, and a legal scholar will engage in a lively discussion on the topic of The Human Genome and Human Health: Will the Promise Be Fulfilled? Discussing where genomics should go in the future, how it might change the doctor’s office in the next decade, and the disparities that exist in the developing world, the panelists will evaluate both the promises of sequencing the human genome and the reality. Below, Rob DeSalle, who curated the Museum’s exhibition The Genomic Revolution 10 years ago, addresses three common myths about genetics.

Tags: Brain, Human Evolution

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