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Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Reopens October 27

News posts

On October 27, Theodore Roosevelt’s 154th birthday, the Museum will officially reopen the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial and the Hall of North American Mammals, launching a year-long celebration of Roosevelt’s love of nature and his instrumental role in the American conservation movement, both inspired by his lifelong association with the Museum. 


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Sea Turtles Solomon Island

A Summer's Work in the Solomon Islands

Research posts

In the Solomon Islands, an archipelago of some 1,000 islands east of Papua New Guinea, the Museum is partnering with indigenous communities to improve biodiversity conservation within ancient customary lands. This summer, Michael Esbach, Pacific Programs manager in the Museum’s Center for Biodiversity and Conservation (CBC), travelled to three of these islands with CBC Pacific Programs Director Christopher Filardi and CBC Director Eleanor Sterling.

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Blind cave fish

Eyeless Australian Cave Fishes' Closest Relatives in Madagascar

Research posts

Researchers from the American Museum of Natural History and Louisiana State University have discovered that two groups of blind cave fishes now separated by about 6,000 miles of open ocean are each other’s closest relatives. These eyeless fishes, one group from Madagascar and the other from Australia, descended from a common ancestor before being separated by continental drift nearly 100 million years ago, the scientists say. Their study, which was published this week in the journal PLOS ONE, also identifies new species that add to existing biological proof for the existence of Gondwana, a prehistoric supercontinent that was part of Pangaea and contained all of today’s southern continents.

The cave fishes, of the genus Typhleotris in Madagascar and Milyeringa in Australia, are small—less than 100 millimeters long—and usually lack pigment, a substance that gives an organism its color and also provides protection from the sun’s ultraviolet radiation. These characteristics, coupled with a lack of eyes and enhanced sensory capabilities, are common in many cave organisms.

Tags: Bioluminescence, Our Research

Ancient mites 400_by_300

Scientists Find Oldest Amber Arthropods on Record

Research posts

Preserved for 230 million years in droplets of amber just millimeters long, two newly named species of mites and a fly have set a record. They are the oldest arthropods – invertebrate animals that include insects, arachnids, and crustaceans – ever found in amber, the name typically given to globules of fossilized resin. The results, published by an international team of researchers in theProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencestoday, pave the way for a better evolutionary understanding of the most diverse group of organisms in the world.

“Amber is an extremely valuable tool for paleontologists because it preserves specimens with microscopic fidelity, allowing uniquely accurate estimates of the amount of evolutionary change over millions of years,” said corresponding author David Grimaldi, a curator in the Museum’s Division of Invertebrate Zoology and a world authority on amber and fossil arthropods.

Even though arthropods are more than 400 million years old, until now, the oldest record of the animals in amber only dates to about 130 million years. The newly discovered specimens are about 100 million years older, the first amber arthropods ever found from the Triassic Period.

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Asimov Debate-Hadron Collider Image

2012 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate–Faster Than the Speed of Light

Podcasts

Einstein's Theory of Special Relativity has been tested with ever-increasing precision since its publication in 1905. One of its key predictions is that only light itself can travel at the speed of light. While the theory does not forbid particles from moving faster, such particles must be traveling backward in time. 

In this podcast, join Hayden Planetarium Director Neil deGrasse Tyson and six of the world's leading voices in this scientific debate for the 2012 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate, “Faster Than the Speed of Light.” This year’s debate pitted some of the experimentalists who claimed to have discovered faster-than-light neutrinos against their strongest critics, and explored the ways that modern physicists are testing the fundamental laws of nature.

The panelists included: 

  • Dr. David Cline, Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA
  • 
Dr. Gian Giudice, Theoretical Physics Division, CERN
  • 
Dr. Sheldon Glashow, Department of Physics, Boston University
  • 
Dr. Chris Hegarty, MITRE’s Center for Advanced Aviation System Development

  • Dr. Laura Patrizii, Department of Physics, University of Bologna

  • Dr. Gabriela González, Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University

The debate was recorded at the Museum on March 20, 2012. Watch a video of the full program on AMNH.tv.

Podcast: Download | RSS | iTunes ( 1 hour, 50 mins, 132 MB)

Tags: Neil deGrasse Tyson, Podcasts

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