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News Posts

Calling All Collectors: Scientists Will Identify Objects at Museum's Identification Day

News posts

Each year, people bring their shells, rocks, insects, feathers, bones, and artifacts to the Museum’s annual Identification Day. On Saturday, June 16, scientists will attempt to identify your discoveries while showing you some specimens from their own collections. Items identified in previous years have included a whale jawbone, a green beetle bracelet from Brazil, and a 5,000-year-old stone spear point from Morocco. Watch the video below for some pointers on what to bring.


Tags: Identification Day

Visiting the Museum's Great Gull Island

Research posts

On the eastern edge of Long Island Sound, a small, rocky piece of land known as Great Gull Island houses the crumbling battlements of a U.S. Army fort and some 11,000 nesting pairs of Common and Roseate Terns. The Museum purchased the island in 1949 to preserve a breeding habitat for terns displaced by increasing development on Long Island’s beaches. The acquisition has proven to be a success, as the remaining Army structures are a nesting tern’s delight.

Tags: Members

Eleanor Sterling

Eleanor Sterling Receives Mentoring Award

Education posts

Museum scientist Eleanor Sterling has been chosen as a recipient of this year’s Faculty Mentoring Award at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Sterling, who is the director of the Museum’s Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, serves as the director of graduate studies and as an adjunct professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology at Columbia.

Tags: Center for Biodiversity and Conservation

Podcast

Podcast: Masters of the Planet with Ian Tattersall

Podcasts

After millions of years of evolution, only one human species remains: Homo sapiens. In this podcast, join Museum Curator Emeritus Ian Tattersall in a discussion about his recent book, Masters of the Planet: The Search for Our Human Origins—a history of paleoanthropology and an account of how Homo sapiens survived while other human species went extinct.

Dr. Tattersall’s talk was recorded at the Museum on April 2, 2012.

Podcast: Download | RSS | iTunes (1 hours, 7 mins, 81 MB)

Tags: Human Evolution, Our Research, Podcasts

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