Shortcut Navigation:

News Posts

JS_snorkel

Curator John Sparks on Fieldwork in Extreme Environments

From the Field posts

Ichthyologist John Sparks, curator of Creatures of Light: Nature’s Bioluminescence, recalls two challenging expeditions in Madagascar in search of new species of blind cavefishes. Read an excerpt of the interview below.

We were in Ankarana Reserve in far northern Madagascar, a surreal landscape of exposed karst formations. These are one-of-a-kind formations of permeable rocks, with rivers and streams in between. It’s kind of like Swiss cheese, with water running through it. We were looking for a species of blind cavefish endemic to this region.

But first, we had to make our way through the piles of bat guano [dung]. The cavefishes, which lack pigment and have no eyes, eat some of the invertebrates that are in the water, but a lot of them survive mainly on guano. There are enormous piles of it in these caves, 20- to 30-foot mounds. When you get closer, the mounds seem to come alive, with millions of clicking, rustling cockroaches that run over your feet and up your legs. It’s just like a scene out of an Indiana Jones movie.

Tags: Bioluminescence

trumbonist

Celebrating New Orleans with Delfeayo Marsalis

Q&As

As part of the national celebrations for Jazz Appreciation Month (JAM) in April, the Museum will honor jazz’s birthplace on Saturday, April 28, with the day-long Global Weekends program New Orleans: Culture Remixed. Headlining the event is famed jazz trombonist and music producer Delfeayo Marsalis, whose family includes saxophonist Branford Marsalis, trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, drummer Jason Marsalis, and pianist Ellis Marsalis. Delfeayo recently answered a few questions about his music.

Tags: Global Weekends, Q&A

creature of light

A Day of Deep-Sea Cameras and Creatures in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life

Q&As

From fireflies to jellyfishes, an astonishing range of animals create their own light. On Sunday, April 22, kids can explore activity carts about glowing organisms while scientists David Gruber, Marc Branham, and Edith Widder share their research about these creatures and the deep-sea vehicles and cameras required to study them. David Gruber, an assistant professor at The City University of New York (CUNY) and a Museum research associate who consulted on the exhibition Creatures of Light: Nature’s Bioluminescence, recently answered a few questions about his deep-sea photography and the Museum.

Tags: Bioluminescence, Exhibitions, Q&A

Cast Your Vote: Picturing Science Video Nominated for Webby Award

News posts

The Museum’s video featuring the exhibition Picturing Science: Museum Scientists and Imaging Technologies has been nominated for the 2012 Webby Awards, the coveted honors for Internet excellence, in the Technology category. Online voting for the Webby People’s Voice Award is open now through April 26.

Picturing Science, currently on view in the Akeley Gallery, tells the story of Museum research through spectacular large-format images. Photographs range from multicolored meteorite montages to CT scans of shark skulls, showcasing the importance of visual tools in each of the Museum’s research departments as well as the fusion of science and art.

Tags:

Mireille Guiliano

The French Paradox with Mireille Guiliano

Q&As

The celebrated richness of France’s cuisine makes the equally exalted slimness of its population that much more of a mystery. At the Adventures in the Global Kitchen program on Wednesday, April 25, Mireille Guiliano, author of the bestseller French Women Don’t Get Fat, addresses the so-called French paradox and offers a selection of frittatas, tartines, and mousse for tasting—in the French style, of course. Guiliano recently answered a few questions.

The French eat some of the richest foods in the world but maintain slim physiques. What’s the secret?

Mireille Guiliano: A different approach to food and eating. The key is to find pleasure in eating while maintaining one’s weight. French women don’t get fat because they eat with their heads and have learned to eat with pleasure while managing their relationship with food and gratifying their appetite. It’s all about balance and knowing thyself.

Tags: Food, Our Global Kitchen, Q&A

SELECT PAGE

American Museum of Natural History

Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192
Phone: 212-769-5100

Open daily from 10 am - 5:45 pm
except on Thanksgiving and Christmas
Maps and Directions