Shortcut Navigation:

News Posts

Showing blog posts tagged with "Space Exploration"

Meteor Crater

Asteroid 2012 DA14's Friday Flyby

News posts

Talk about an eventful Friday night! Tomorrow night, a small asteroid will travel nearer Earth than any astronomers have identified beforehand. “It’s the closest that we’ve seen ahead of time,” says Denton S. Ebel, curator in the Division of Physical Sciences (Earth and Planetary Sciences).

For more about the asteroid flyby, participate in a live Twitter chat with Ebel, this Friday, February 15, at noon ETPost your questions here or use hashtag #asteroidchat on Twitter.

Tags: Astrophysics, Space Exploration

Beyond Planet Earth_Sputnik_thumbnail

Back to the Start of Space Race in Beyond Planet Earth

On Exhibit posts

On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Union launched Sputnik-1, the first man-made satellite to successfully orbit the Earth, its beeping signal picked up by radio operators around the globe. Weighing in at just under 184 pounds and measuring 22.8 inches in diameter, Sputnik soared to space amid the tensions of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, creating significant political and scientific fallout. A life-sized model of the satellite, whose name means “fellow traveler” in Russian, is featured in the current exhibition Beyond Planet Earth: The Future of Space Exploration.

Tags: Hayden Planetarium, Space Exploration

Sputnik-250

Beyond Planet Earth: Starting with Sputnik

News posts

In December 1957, two months after the launch of the Russian satellite Sputnik 1, the first human-made object to enter space and the catalyst for the space race, the Museum published a memo titled “Calling All Scientists,” which observed how the lone satellite had shifted the public appraisal of scientists. “[P]ress people dashed up to the museum to get the Planetarium staff to help them explain to the public what had happened,” the memo read. “The scientists are now being turned to for guidance.”

Tags: Hayden Planetarium, Space Exploration

lunar-base-2501

Reflections on Space: Liquid Mirror Telescopes in Beyond Planet Earth

News posts

Imagine a mirror as wide as a football field at the South Pole of the Moon. Instead of polished glass, its surface is made of a reflective liquid, which spins in a circle.

Scientists hope to make this vision into a reality one day by using a liquid mirror to build a giant lunar telescope that would allow astronomers to see farther into the universe than ever before. In the Museum’s special exhibition Beyond Planet Earth: The Future of Space Exploration, visitors can see two liquid mirror telescopes: one featured as part of a Moonscape diorama, the other, an interactive model that can be operated with the push of a button.

Tags: Hayden Planetarium, Space Exploration

SELECT PAGE

American Museum of Natural History

Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192
Phone: 212-769-5100

Open daily from 10 am - 5:45 pm
except on Thanksgiving and Christmas
Maps and Directions

Enlighten Your Inbox

Stay informed about Museum news and research, events, and more!