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Hatchetfishes

Bioluminescence Across the Tree of Life

On Exhibit posts

Curator John Sparks is blogging weekly about the Museum’s upcoming exhibition, Creatures of Light, which opens on Saturday, March 31.

Many people are familiar with the summertime flashing patterns of fireflies and have seen images of bizarre bioluminescent deep-sea fishes. However, few realize how pervasive bioluminescence is throughout the tree of life. Bioluminescence is  known to occur in bacteria, protists, fungi, crustaceans, insects, worms, ctenophores, jellyfishes, squids, starfishes, sea cucumbers, tunicates, and fishes—not to mention sharks—as well as numerous additional invertebrate lineages.

Tags: Bioluminescence

Ira Flatow: Science Friday at the Museum

Q&As

This Wednesday, March 28, NPR’s popular weekly talk show Science Friday travels to the Museum for a special public recording in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life. Host Ira Flatowwill interview Museum Curator Emeritus Ian Tattersall about how Homo sapiens became the dominant human species and speak to a panel of urban biodiversity experts, including Eleanor Sterling, the director of the Museum’s Center for Biodiversity and Conservation. Flatow recently shared what he’s looking forward to about the evening.

Tags: Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, Q&A

Podcast

Podcast: The 4 Percent Universe with Richard Panek

Podcasts

In recent years, a radically new vision of the universe has emerged: only 4 percent of it consists of every planet, star, and galaxy. The rest—96 percent—is completely unknown. How did astronomers reach this cosmos-shattering conclusion, and what are they doing to find dark matter and an even more bizarre substance called dark energy?

Tags: Podcasts

Rufous Hummingbird Ottavio

Stray Hummingbird Stays Till Spring

News posts

When a stray Rufous Hummingbird from the West came to the Museum in early December, no one thought she’d stay through snow, wind, and below-freezing nights—let alone until spring.

Still in the bushes on the equinox, this “vagrant,” the official term for migrators outside their range, is the first stray hummingbird in recent memory to overwinter in New York. En route to her wintering grounds in Mexico, she likely miscalculated the angle of her flight path south, landing her in the Museum’s shrubs outside the 81st Street entrance.

Tags: Birds

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