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Chris Filardi

From Beaks to Genes: Chris Filardi on Island Birds and Biology

Q&As

Chris Filardi is the director of Pacific Programs at the Museum’sCenter for Biodiversity and Conservation. He has spent his career studying island birds and their unique ecologies, from working with indigenous communities to conserve island ecosystems to tracking the foraging behavior of Palm Cockatoos. At the upcoming SciCafe on Wednesday, April 4, Filardi will talk about how the genomic revolution and increased access to islands have changed how these systems are studied. He recently answered a few questions about the role islands play in understanding speciation, or how new species arise.

Tags: Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, Q&A, SciCafe

Podcast

Podcast: SciCafe: Adventures in Superstring Theory

Podcasts

Theoretical physicist Dr. S. James Gates, Jr. uses mathematics to understand string theory and superstring theory, candidates for a single, unified theory of the universe. In this talk from a recent SciCafe, Dr. Gates describes the basics of string theory and talks about the discovery of computer codes—like those used in web browsers—embedded in the equations of superstring theory.

The SciCafe took place at the Museum on January 4, 2012.

Podcast: Download | RSS | iTunes (49 mins, 59 MB)

Tags: Podcasts, SciCafe

Science Bulletins Will Profile Carbon Capture Experiment

News posts

This week, a producer with the Museum’s multimedia online and exhibition program Science Bulletins is heading to the North Sea to create a documentary film about a long-running experiment in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS): a process where high-pressure carbon dioxide, a byproduct of energy production that contributes to global warming, is buried underground until it incorporates into the rock.

Tags: Science Bulletins

Fireflies

Reading the Language of Firefly Flashes

On Exhibit posts

Flashing flirted its way up the firefly family tree. These beetles’ evolutionary history shows a strange metamorphosis unfolding. Firefly eyes grow bigger, more bug-like, as the insects’ light organs enlarge. Their antennae, used like a nose to follow pheromones, shrink into stubs. The more important bioluminescent courtship signaling became throughout their history, the more the trappings of invisible communication faded out.

When Marc Branham, a professor of entomology at the University of Florida, began researching fireflies, he assumed such a beloved animal would be a textbook case in entomology. He was shocked to learn how little scientists knew about the common insect.

Tags: Bioluminescence

Q&A with Ian Tattersall: Masters of the Planet

Q&As

Museum Curator Emeritus Ian Tattersall’s latest book, Masters of the Planet: The Search for Our Human Origins, offers a look at early human ancestors and reveals how our species came to rule the planet. On Wednesday, March 28, Tattersall will discuss his work with Science Friday host Ira Flatow at a live recording of NPR’s popular talk show in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life. He will also speak about the book at a special Museum lecture on Monday, April 2. Tattersall recently answered a few questions about Masters of the Planet.

Tags: Human Evolution, Q&A

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