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Dinosaur Fossils Head to Fanwood, NJ, on Sunday, June 12

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A special specimen table featuring items from the Museum’s world-famous dinosaur collection will be traveling to the Fanwood Street Fair and Craft Show in downtown Fanwood this Sunday, June 12, from 11 am to 5 pm.

Jonah Choiniere, a scientist from the Museum’s Division of Paleontology, will be on hand with touchable specimens, including dinosaur teeth and claws; “prehistoric poop,” (fossilized dung known as coprolite); a horn dinosaur arm bone; dinosaur skin impressions; shark teeth; and more.

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dino-naming

Meet Mame, the Newly Named Mamenchisaurus

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The results are in! We asked you to submit a nickname for Mamenchisaurus, the giant sauropod at the center of The World’s Largest Dinosaurs exhibition, currently on view at the Museum.

After hundreds of submissions and thousands of votes, the winner by a landslide is: Mame!

Runners up included Neckita—a nod to her extraordinary 30-foot neck, the longest relative to body size of any known dinosaur—and Mei Mei (“mei” means beauty in Chinese).

Tags: Dinosaurs

Zuni Museum Enlists AMNH

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A delegation of five Zuni representatives visited the American Museum of Natural History recently on an exciting cultural mission—to add the Museum’s substantial ethnographic collection of over 1,700 Zuni artifacts to an innovative digital collaborative catalog created by and for the Zuni people. This collaboration was funded by the National Park Service through a generous grant, which the Museum applied for on the delegation’s behalf.

Tags: Anthropology

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Ammonites Dined on Plankton

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Powerful synchrotron scans of Baculites fossils found on American Museum of Natural History expeditions to the Great Plains suggests that the extinct group of marine invertebrates to which they belong, the ammonites, had jaws and teeth adapted for eating small prey floating in the water. One ammonite also provided direct evidence of a planktonic diet because it died with its last meal in its mouth — tiny larval snails and crustacean bits. The detailed description of internal structure of ammonites, published by a Franco-American research team this week in Science, also provides new insights into why ammonites became extinct 65.5 million years ago when an asteroid impact led to the demise of the world’s nonavian dinosaurs and much of the plankton.

“I was astonished when I saw the teeth for the first time, and when I found the tiny plankton in the mouth,” says first author Isabelle Kruta of the Département Histoire de la Terre, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle in Paris, France. Kruta began the project as an Annette Kade fellow at the American Museum of Natural History. “For the first time we could observe these delicate, exceptionally well-preserved structures and obtain information on the ecology of these enigmatic animals.”

Tags: Invertebrates

Joshua Light Show presents Fulldome at the Museum June 3-5

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For three nights only, New York’s legendary Joshua Light Show will present Fulldome, an eye-popping, 360-degree work of light and sound that explores the neurological phenomenon synesthesia, or the blending of sensory experiences, in the American Museum of Natural History’s Hayden Planetarium.

The program will begin with an after-hours visit to the exhibition Brain: The Inside Story, which explores how the brain interprets light and sound. Then, visitors will enjoy a multi-sensory experience in the Hayden Planetarium’s Space Theater.

Tags: Brain, Hayden Planetarium

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