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The Arthur Ross Terrace will be closed this morning, Tuesday, October 21, for a private cultural observance. You many observe smoke and/or fire coming from the Terrace at that time. The FDNY has been notified in advance, and all safety precautions are in place. The Terrace will reopen at 1 pm.

News Posts

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Museum Scientist Will Oversee Sample Analysis For 2016 Mission to Asteroid

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Geologist Harold C. Connolly, a research associate in the Museum’s Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, will oversee sample analysis on the first U.S. mission to collect material from an asteroid and bring it to Earth for study.

NASA announced the new mission-which is called Origins-Spectral Interpretation-Resource Identification-Security-Regolith Explorer, or OSIRIS-REx-in late May as the third mission in its New Frontiers Program. An unmanned spacecraft will be launched in 2016 to the near-Earth asteroid 1999 RQ36 and will travel for four years to its destination. After OSIRIS-REx performs surface mapping of the asteroid—a process that may take up to 505 days—Connolly will be responsible for recommending locations most suitable for sampling.

“We will narrow it down to several choices to select the best location based on low risk to the spacecraft and on chemical signatures” found during surface mapping, says Connolly, who is also professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the City University of New York.

Tags: NASA

Podcast

Podcast: 21st Annual Environmental Lecture and Luncheon

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On April 12, 2011, the American Museum of Natural History hosted the 21st Annual Environmental Lecture and Luncheon, “A New Food Culture for a Sustainable Future.”

The luncheon featured a panel of sustainable food experts who addressed topics ranging from urban agriculture to how eating locally can affect the community, environment, and the planet. Moderated by Lynn Sherr, a former “20/20″ correspondent, the panel included Nevin Cohen, assistant professor of Environmental Studies at The New School and urban food policy expert; Dickson Despommier, emeritus professor at Columbia University and inventor of the vertical farm concept; and Nancy Easton, founder and executive director of Wellness in the Schools.

Listen to a portion of the 2011 lecture in this podcast.

Tags: Podcasts

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Back in Black: Upgraded Projector Enriches Dome Experience

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As dazzling as Hayden Planetarium programs have always been, their impact has been magnified many-fold by a recent $2 million upgrade. In essence, the projection system has caught up with the science, making it possible for audiences to see thousands of stars that astrophysicists had been able to identify and even include in various space visualizations but which didn’t show up on the dome’s surface because of technological constraints.

Tags: Hayden Planetarium

2011 Urban Advantage Science Expo at the Museum

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Chancellor Dennis M. Walcott of the New York City Department of Education joined Museum President Ellen V. Futter, families, teachers, and New York City Council Member Gale Brewer in the Museum’s Milstein Hall of Ocean Life on June 12 as more than 800 middle school students presented research projects in a citywide science expo to mark the end of a successful seventh year for the Urban Advantage Middle School Initiative.

Urban Advantage—a public-private partnership between the Department of Education and a Museum-led consortium of eight institutions that also include the New York Hall of Science, the Bronx Zoo, the New York Aquarium, the New York Botanical Garden, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, the Queens Botanical Garden, and the Staten Island Zoo—emphasizes evidence-based inquiry in science teaching and learning. More than 300 science exit projects were on display in the 2011 expo, reflecting a wide range of topics investigated by students during visits to Urban Advantage institutions.

Tags: Children's Programs

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Scientific Illustration at the Museum

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Before the camera, scientists depended on drawings to replicate the natural world, its flora and fauna, on the printed page. But even today, well after the arrival of photography and other sophisticated imaging techniques, old-school illustration persists as the method of choice in books, articles, and professional research papers. So how has this craft survived alongside photos and high-tech scans?

First, there are some instances—such as portraying an extinct animal no human has ever seen—that simply demand creative rendering. But even with extant species, scientists say that, with the possible exception of presenting small areas of minute surface detail, there is simply no substitute for putting pen to paper.  Even 3-D scanned images can lack the resolution needed to represent complex structures, color gradations, and other essential details.

It is not a matter of resisting technology. Many scientific illustrators use computer software to execute their drawings or to tweak pen or pencil images after they have been digitized. And most consider computed tomography, scanning electron microscopy, and other high-resolution imaging techniques important tools, enhancements of the eye that allow for ever more detail in the finished drawing. (Picturing Science: Museum Scientists and Imaging Technologies, an exhibition showcasing examples of such imaging and its use in Museum research, will be on view in the Akeley Gallery starting Saturday, June 25.)

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American Museum of Natural History

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New York, NY 10024-5192
Phone: 212-769-5100

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