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Showing blog posts tagged with Neil deGrasse Tyson

First Comes the Dream Crop

Neil Tyson Speaks at First Comes the Dream

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What inspires scientists and innovators? On July 19, First Comes the Dream, a celebration of New York City’s emergence as a premier technology center, brought luminaries from science, technology, and media to the Museum to find out.

Co-hosted by the Museum with leading tech blog Gizmodo and social networking app Foursquare, the evening began in the Hayden Planetarium with remarks from Museum President Ellen Futter, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, and New York City Deputy Mayor Robert Steel before launching the awe-struck audience on a tour of the universe with the Museum’s Director of Astrovisualization Carter Emmart.

Next, Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, director of the Museum’s Hayden Planetarium, sat down for an interview with iO9’s Annalee Newitz in the Cullman Hall of the Universe. In the video below, find out what sparked Dr. Tyson’s interest in astronomy and what he thinks the future of space exploration might hold.


Tags: Hayden Planetarium, Neil deGrasse Tyson

Manhattanhenge

Four Things to Know About Manhattanhenge

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Four nights a year, the streets of Manhattan’s grid become the site for a spectacular sunset phenomenon known as Manhattanhenge. Below are answers to frequently asked questions about this event.

What is Manhattanhenge?

As Director of the Hayden Planetarium Neil deGrasse Tyson, who discovered the phenomenon and coined the term “Manhattanhenge,” explains in his Hayden Planetarium blog, Manhattanhenge takes place “when the setting Sun aligns precisely with the Manhattan street grid, creating a radiant glow of light across Manhattan’s brick and steel canyons, simultaneously illuminating both the north and south sides of every cross street of the borough’s grid. A rare and beautiful sight.”

Tags: Hayden Planetarium, Neil deGrasse Tyson

Neil Tyson

Titanic in 3D Includes Neil Tyson’s Star Fix

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Today’s re-release of James Cameron’s blockbuster film Titanic in 3D will feature just one altered shot: a corrected view of the stars in the early hours of April 15, 1912, the day the “unsinkable” British ocean liner went down in the Atlantic Ocean.

The adjustment was made in response to feedback that Cameron, who is known for his meticulous attention to detail, received from Hayden Planetarium Director Neil deGrasse Tyson, who noticed an inaccuracy in the film after it was first released in 1997.

Tags: Neil deGrasse Tyson

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