Shortcut Navigation:

Make It a Pterosaurs Weekend, and Discover the Power of Poison

News posts

Ready, set, pterosaurs! This Saturday marks the opening of the exciting new exhibition Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs. Now extinct, this diverse group of flying reptiles lived from about 220 to 66 million years ago. After insects, pterosaurs were the first group to evolve powered flight—and the first-ever vertebrates to take to the air.

Visitors in Pterosaurs exhibition

Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs features the diversity of the 150 known species of these flying reptiles. See it for yourself April 5, 2014, through January 4, 2015. 

© AMNH/D. Finnin


Diverse in size, wing-shape, and much more, the 150 known species of pterosaur are likely just a fraction of those that ever lived.

But pterosaur bones are very fragile, and relatively few fossils have been found. The exhibition features eight rare specimens in addition to multiple casts, along with interactive exhibits reflecting the latest research about how these ancient reptiles moved on land and in the air, what they ate, and how their remains preserved.

Though pterosaurs were cousins of dinosaurs, their Latin names may not be not as familiar as, say, Apatosaurus or T. rex. In this video pronunciation guide, students from Museum programs help decipher some of the more complicated pterosaur genus names, from Jeholopterus to Quetzalcoatlus.


Learn more about the exhibition, and download the new Pterosaurs iPad app here.

The Power of Poison

Poison is an enduring presence in our lives: from fairy tales and myths to its role in medicine and human health.

Poison_Witches

 And, as The Power of Poison reveals, nature is rife with organisms—from plants to ocean animals to familiar snakes, wasps, and even butterflies—that use poisons to evade predators or capture prey. Find out the difference between poisons, toxins, and venoms in a video below.  


Learn about poison in the current exhibition, which includes an enchanted book, a live presentation about forensics, and mysteries for the whole family to solve.

American Museum of Natural History

Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192
Phone: 212-769-5100

Open daily from 10 am - 5:45 pm
except on Thanksgiving and Christmas
Maps and Directions