This Weekend at the Museum: Crocs, Concerts, and More

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It looks like rainy weather arrived just in time for the weekend, but we've got you covered. Whether you're interested in live animals, live music, or a look at the life on (and inside) your body every day, there's a lot to do at the Museum this weekend, and you can stay dry for all of it. 

Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall Image

The Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall on the Museum's first floor.

© AMNH/D.Finnin


This Sunday, June 5, kicks off the Celebrate National Parks! Theodore Roosevelt Concert Series with a musical performance by the Sweet Out-of-Lines, a vocal ensemble from the Celia Cruz Bronx High School of Music. Every Sunday afternoon through June 26 the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall on the Museum's first floor will host live musical celebrations of the country's greatest natural treasures: American's national parks, the first of which were established by Theodore Roosevelt a century ago.

In addition to live music, there will be hands-on activities inspired like sculpting and painting, guided by Museum artists and inspired by America’s breathtaking natural landscapes. 


In Gallery 77 this weekend, you can meet live crocodiles and alligators from around the world—including a group of adorable American alligator hatchlings—at the Museum's newest exhibition, Crocs: Ancient Predators in a Modern World.

What-Are-You-Made-Of

Find out what you're made of by participating in the Healthy Microbiome Project.

© AMNH/G. D'Allesandro


And if you want to learn about science while also contributing to it, stop by the Sackler Educational Laboratory, where you can be part of the Healthy Microbiome Project. Medical staff will be on hand to take samples of the microbial communities of volunteers (18 and older) via a quick, simple swabbing of their hands, mouths, and nostrils. This anonymized data will help scientists learn more about the makeup of the human microbiome and the role it plays it human health. Those who don't want to participate, or are too young, can still stop by the lab to see bacteria under a microscope, view colonies of growing microbes in culture, and more. And if that's not enough, you can still stop by The Secret World Inside You, an exhibition about the microbial populations living in, on, and alongside humans and their importance in our lives.