Countdown to Zero: Malaria

On Exhibit posts

Four siblings rest peacefully beneath a long-lasting insecticide-treated bed net. The net keeps away mosquitoes that can carry lymphatic filariasis and malaria. Ethiopia, 2007  © The Carter Center/L. Gubb

Four siblings rest peacefully beneath a long-lasting insecticide-treated bed net. The net keeps away mosquitoes that can carry lymphatic filariasis and malaria. Ethiopia, 2007 

© The Carter Center/L. Gubb


Disease agent: Plasmodium parasites

The threat: Though preventable and curable, malaria continues to infect hundreds of millions annually across about 100 countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

How infection spreads: Through the bites of female Anopheles mosquitoes; there are numerous species of Anopheles around the world.

Defeating the disease: Widespread use of insecticidal bed nets has been successful in stopping transmission, and vaccines are in development. Genetically engineering mosquitoes is another approach that is being considered.

Eradication potential: Malaria has been eliminated in certain regions, while for others, control may be the most effective short-term approach.

What does it take to wipe out a disease? Find out in the new exhibition Countdown to Zero: Defeating Disease

The full story appears in the Winter issue of Rotunda, the Member magazine.