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Chapter 3 - Looking at Habitats

life_science

 

 

Unit B - Habitats

  • Chapter 3 - Looking at Habitats

What are habitats?

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Hands-on Activity

Make an Ecosystem Diorama

Now you can gaze at your favorite museum diorama anytime you want, night or day. Grab your crayons, and create a shoe-box replica of A Wading Bird Rookery, The Olympic Rain Forest, or A Giant Cactus Forest.

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Story

What's the Big Idea About Biodiversity?

It's the differences in this world that make all the difference! Find out why biodiversity is so important to our planet—and what you can do to help protect it.

Welcome-to-the-Dzanga-Sangha

Interactive

Welcome to the Dzanga-Sangha

Travel to the lush Dzanga-Sangha rainforest with BaAka. This excellent tour guide will show you the sights—and help you find the clues needed to play Connect the Dots.

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Interactive

Dive Into Worlds Within the Sea

Which squirmy little creatures does the spiny lobster eat? Can you spot the weird greenish glow on the belly of the cookie-cutter shark? Show off your good thinking with a game of good linking.

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Hands-on Activity

Web of Life

Play the Web of Life game to discover how all the players in an ecosystem depend on each other to survive. As you play, you'll come up with the connections between different species and their environments.

Life-in-the-City

Interactive

Life in the City

Even the busiest of cities are buzzing with biodiversity. Take a virtual stroll through a city park for a close-up look at some of the inhabitants you otherwise might not notice.

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Interactive

Work the System!

Did you know that forests with leaves above the water can grow in the ocean? Grab the magical magnifying glass, and see how many different plants and animals you can find in this virtual mangrove swamp. 

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Story

What's the Big Idea About Paleontology?

Most living things never become fossils. And most of the fossils created will never be found. Learn more about these extremely rare—and valuable—records of the past. 

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Curriculum Materials

What is a Fossil?

The most common fossils are bones and teeth, but not all fossils are body parts. Explore the wide-ranging evidence of ancient life that scientists use to understand Earth's prehistoric past.

The Spectrum of Life

The Spectrum of Life

The Spectrum of Life is an evolutionary trip through the amazing diversity of life on Earth. The 1,500 specimens represent a wide range of bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals, from the smallest microorganisms to terrestrial and aquatic giants.

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