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Tsunami Science: Reducing the Risk

Science Bulletin

Tsunami Science: Reducing the Risk

The scientific data left in the wake of the horrific December 26, 2004 tsunami is proving invaluable to better prepare for future events. Meet the researchers at the crest of this relatively young science. Featured are the geologists, seismologists, and computer modelers of the U.S. Pacific Northwest, an area replete with geological and anthropological evidence of past tsunamis. Learn how the region is preparing for its inevitable next wave.

Sloan Digital Sky Survey Thumb

Science Bulletin

Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Mapping the Universe

Taking a census of all the luminous objects in one-quarter of the visible cosmos is a hefty accounting job. It takes a specially-built telescope on task every clear night for eight years, wielding one of the biggest digital cameras on the planet. Over a hundred million stars, galaxies, and quasars have been tallied so far. Meet the astronomical observers and theorists set on divining the three-dimensional structure and origins of the Universe from these unprecedented scores of data.

Yellowstone: Monitoring the Fire Below

Science Bulletin

Yellowstone: Monitoring the Fire Below

Three of the most catastrophic volcanic eruptions in geologic history occurred at a place now visited by nearly four million people a year: Yellowstone National Park. The magma chamber responsible still lies beneath, and continues to steam, heat, and shift the park landscape. Science Bulletins talks with the geologists regularly monitoring these disquieting signals to understand where this active region lies in its volcanic life span.

Curriculum Materials

Dinosaurs Alive Booklist for Adults

Meet the little dinosaurs of Ghost Ranch. Investigate evolution and the loss of flight in dinosaurs and birds. And dig deep into the lives of dinosaurs with these recommended reads.

Melting Ice, Rising Seas

Science Bulletin

Melting Ice, Rising Seas

The rising temperatures of global climate change are melting the world's ice. Most notable are the shrinking ice sheets of Greenland and west Antarctica, which have shown dramatic loss in recent years.

Gamma-Ray Bursts: Flashes in the Sky

Science Bulletin

Gamma-Ray Bursts: Flashes in the Sky

Gamma-ray bursts—flashes of intense radiation in space that are often just seconds long—were accidentally discovered in the 1960's by satellites built to monitor nuclear bomb explosions. They've been one of the leading astrophysical mysteries ever since. This Astro Bulletin introduces you to the scientists and instruments working to unravel the origins of gamma-ray bursts. It highlights Swift, NASA's burst-detecting satellite, and PAIRITEL, one of a fleet of ground-based telescopes that point toward a gamma-ray burst in response to Swift's alert to capture the afterglow before it fades. Astrophysicists at Penn State and other institutions are analyzing these afterglows to understand what causes the most powerful explosions known

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