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In a Future Ocean, It Takes a Thick Skin

The next time you pry a clamshell or crack a lobster claw for dinner, pay a small homage. For many ocean creatures with hard shells, growing that armor is taking more effort than ever. Find out why.

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Species and Sprawl: Mountain Lions

What's the animal-friendly antidote to California's urbanization? Some believe the solution is to make the corridors between disparate patches of wild lands truly useable by many different species.

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Article: Carbon Sinks and Carbon Bombs

Scott Goetz has studied the boreal forest of Alaska for more than two decades, but year by year, the landscape is becoming less familiar to him. See how climate change is affecting the forest — and how the forest, in turn, may be influencing climate.

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Article: Understanding a Marine Wilderness (in Parts)

Just like we have official wilderness areas on land, some people think we need them in the marine realm. Consider the need for vast stretches of coral reefs, underwater lawns of seagrass, and miles of open ocean.

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Article: Marine Reserves—Living Local

Fishing supports residents all over the 700 Bahamian islands, but even more so in the less-accessible “Out Islands” like the Exumas. What does it mean for locals when their home becomes a "no-take" marine protected area? Find out.

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Article: Marine Species on the Line

The bulk of fishing income in The Bahamas is brought in by three species: the Nassau grouper, the queen conch, and the Caribbean spiny lobster. Find out how these overfished species are maintaining a foothold in The Bahamas.

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The Sorry Story of Georges Bank

Find out why this huge shoal between Massachusetts' Cape Cod and Nova Scotia's Cape Sable Island is one of the world's most important fishing resources — and why it's now at risk.

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Essay: Chasing Invaders on a Water Planet

Water bodies on our planet form a network, which aquatic species migrate over evolutionary time as needed or by accident. Find out how Homo sapiens have dramatically changed and accelerated this process.

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Science Stays Alert, Part I: Birds Under Scrutiny

In a handful of cases, humans have contracted H5N1 from birds and then passed the virus to other humans. Even so, doctors and scientists are taking great pains to prepare for the possibility of such a pandemic.

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