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Biodiversity Science in Vietnam

Vietnam harbors an astonishing range of habitats, from rain forests and dry forests to mangroves and coral reefs. It's also home to an unusually rich array of plants and animals. Find out why.

SOFIA thumb

Science Bulletin

SOFIA: Stars and the Space Between

By sending an infrared telescope to altitudes of 12,000 meters (40,000 feet) and higher, NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) conduct astronomical research that would be impossible using telescopes based on Earth. The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy—SOFIA—is the only airborne telescope in the world. Infrared imaging of stars and planets is difficult from ground-based observatories, because water vapor in Earth's lower atmosphere blocks most infrared radiation. SOFIA operates from a modified Boeing 747, soaring high above occluding vapor to capture infrared emissions from distant galaxies. Using instruments that include a high-speed imager and a sensitive far-infrared spectrometer, SOFIA will provide insights into distant star formation, the chemical composition of deep space, and the atmospheres of planets within our own solar system.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. Find out more about Science Bulletins at http://www.amnh.org/sciencebulletins/.

Brown Dwarfs: Tail End of the Stars

Science Bulletin

Brown Dwarfs: Tail End of the Stars

Journey to the heights of Mauna Kea in Hawaii where astronomers search for brown dwarfs, cosmic bodies that are not quite stars and not quite planets. These long-sought objects are still elusive and visible largely with advanced technologies such as the adaptive optics tools on the Keck II telescope.

The Expanding Universe

Science Bulletin

Our Expanding Universe

In 1998, astrophysicists discovered a baffling phenomenon: the Universe is expanding at an ever-faster rate. Either an enigmatic force called dark energy is to blameor a reworking of gravitational theory is in order. In this new Science Bulletins video, watch a Fermilab team assemble the Dark Energy Camera, a device that could finally solve this space-stretching mystery.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. Each Bulletin is produced by AMNHs curatorial and scientific staff and a team of video producers, designers, writers, and educators using state-of-the-art technologies such as high-definition video and 3-D computer graphics to present the latest research.

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