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A Simple Plan for Supremacy

Article

A Simple Plan for Supremacy

Only in recent years have marine biologists come to grasp the astonishing abundance of gelatinous animals in the world's waters. Discover how that knowledge is helping them better understand how ocean food webs work.

How the Jelly Got Its Glow

Article

How the Jelly Got Its Glow

To truly understand the deep sea, scientists need to turn off the lights on their submersible vehicles. Then they can see the ghostly blue flickers of bioluminescence produced by virtually every organism of the deep.

Welcome to the Subfamily

Article

Welcome to the Subfamily

Meet "Big Red," a new species of jellyfish that is bulbous, dusky red, and huge, nearly one meter (about three feet) in diameter, with several fleshy arms instead of tentacles, like a balloon with greedy fingers.

Interactive

Observing Jellies

Long ago, people studied jellies by peering over the side of a boat and drawing the creatures as they bobbed nearby. See how much has changed since the 1800s.

Article: Lemurs in Madagascar—Now

Article

Article: Lemurs in Madagascar—Now

The ring-tailed lemurs that romp around the research camp at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve in southwest Madagascar spend plenty of time behaving badly. The same isn't true for their counterparts in the wild.

Article: Lemurs in Madagascar—Then

Article

Article: Lemurs in Madagascar—Then

The lemurs of Madagascar, the most diverse group of primates in the world, had even more members in their ranks before humans first arrived on the island two millennia ago — 16 of the perhaps 70 species aren’t around anymore.

The Uncommon Aye-Aye: An Interview with Eleanor Sterling

Article

The Uncommon Aye-Aye: An Interview with Eleanor Sterling

The dozens of diverse lemur species on Madagascar are a motley crew. Still, none look and act quite like the aye-aye. Take a closer look at this lemur, which is considered one of the world's strangest animals altogether.

Why Mangroves Matter

Article

Why Mangroves Matter

Learn more about these forests, once generally dismissed as swampy wastelands but now valued as remarkably diverse and important ecosystems.

What's a Mangrove? And How Does It Work?

Article

What's a Mangrove? And How Does It Work?

Investigate this remarkably tough plant that can live in water up to 100 times saltier than most other plants can tolerate, not to mention thrive despite twice-daily flooding by ocean tides.

Mangrove Threats and Solutions

Article

Mangrove Threats and Solutions

Straddling land and sea and teeming with life, mangrove forests are key to healthy coastal ecosystems. They're also among the most threatened habitats in the world. Learn more.

Article: When Is "Wild" Actually "Feral"?

Article

Article: When Is "Wild" Actually "Feral"?

The takhi is the only true wild horse left in the world. The so-called "wild" horses that abound in Australia and North America are actually feral. Find out what it means when a domestic animal becomes feral. 

Essay: A Rogue's Gallery of Gravity-Makers

Essay

Essay: A Rogue's Gallery of Gravity-Makers

Anything with an accelerating mass has a gravitational effect — an atomic bomb, a spinning aircraft carrier, even you. Learn more about these ripples in space and how LIGO is designed to capture the biggest gravitational waves.

Essay: LIGO's Extended Family

Essay

Essay: LIGO's Extended Family

LIGO, or the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, is just one of five large-scale gravitational-wave detectors in the world. Find out how they rely on each other to achieve their goals.

Essay: Capturing Phantoms: Gamma-Ray Bursts

Essay

Essay: Capturing Phantoms: Gamma-Ray Bursts

Our eyes can only detect a fraction of light in the electromagnetic spectrum — otherwise we’d see gamma-ray bursts, flashes that outshine the sun by a million trillion times, about once a day. Learn more.

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