SciCafe

The Search for Slow Lorises

March 1, 2017

Close up of a Slow Loris on a branch, species name Nycticebus pygmaeus

Slow lorises may look like big-eyed Ewoks, but their cute countenance has made these primates a target of the illegal wildlife trade. Join Mary Blair, primatologist and Director of Biodiversity Informatics Research at the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, as she discusses how research on these endangered animals can contribute to a better understanding of wildlife trafficking, including the risk of zoonotic disease spread.

Read More

  • Watch a video on slow loris conservation in Vietnam.
  • See how this big-eyed mammal packs an unusually deadly bite.
  • Read blog posts from Mary Blair during her spring expedition to Vietnam.
  • An article on fighting wildlife trafficking with interdisciplinary research and a legacy of international collaboration.
  • Learn more about wildlife trade research at the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation.
    Check out Monday’s Facebook Live for more information about lorises.

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Send Us Your Playlist!

Curate a playlist based on March's SciCafe topic, “The Search for Slow Lorises,” for a chance to have it played at the event.

Step #1: Log-in to your Spotify account
Step #2: Follow amnhpublicprograms 
Step #3: Curate a 90-minute playlist based on the month’s SciCafe theme
Step #4: Title your album playlist by month and your name (we want to be sure to give you a shout-out!)
Step #5: Share it with amnhpublicprograms

MicroCulture: A Social Card Game About the Human Microbiome

Get to know your fellow SciCafe geeks in this card-based social game that embodies the behavior of the human microbiome. Be a part of the largest culture of human microbes at the end of the evening to receive geeky giveaways.

The SciCafe series is proudly sponsored by Judy and Josh Weston.    

SciCafe: The Search for Slow Lorises, and related activities are generously supported by the Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).