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Grades 3-5



The Butterfly Kingdom

Taiwan may be a small island, but it's home to more kinds of butterflies than any almost other place in the world — about 400 species have been discovered by scientists. Find out why. 



If Rocks Could Talk

Whether 4.5 billion or 900 years old, every rock has a story to tell, giving us clues about the history of the Earth. Explore these stories by looking at igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks.



Living Large

Sauropods dominated the Earth for 140 million years. How did they reach their massive sizes? What did they look like, how did they move, and what did they eat? Enter the lab to discover the answer first hand. 



Are YOU cut out for Mars?

Do you have what it takes to go on a space mission to the Red Planet? Take this quiz to find out! 


Interactive: A Hotspot Trail

Yellowstone National Park lies above a stationary hotspot deep in Earth's mantle. See how previous volcanic eruptions of the hotspot have left a trail of calderas that ends, at the moment, with Yellowstone.




The butterfly begins life as an egg, emerges as a caterpillar, and then undergoes a complete change in body form during development.


Curriculum Materials

Plant Ecology

Go beyond the basics of field study—use math and science skills and dig in the dirt! Students learn how to count plants as part of a study of local biodiversity and  calculating biodiversity indexes. 

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Curriculum Materials

Detecting UV Light

You can't see the Sun's ultraviolet rays with your eyes—you just see their results on your freckled, tanned, or sunburned skin. Build a bracelet that immediately detects these invisible rays.

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Curriculum Materials

White Light and Colored Light

When does mixing every color under the rainbow create pure white rather than a murky brown or black? When light, not paint, is the medium—and you're subtracting, not adding, color.

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Curriculum Materials

What Teeth Tell Us

Are those sharp, pointy dinosaur teeth all the better to eat you with? Or are they designed for tough vegetation? Examine dinosaur teeth as a paleontologist would.


American Museum of Natural History

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New York, NY 10024-5192
Phone: 212-769-5100

Open daily from 10 am-5:45 pm
except on Thanksgiving and Christmas
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