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Grades 3-5



Thump, Thump, Thump ... How Dinosaurs Moved

Want to see firsthand how a dinosaur moved? Observe a bird as it walks along the sidewalk or in your backyard. Then challenge a friend to a "push-up" race—dinosaur versus crocodile.


Classroom Activity

Be a Sleuth: How Dinosaurs Behaved

Like today's crime-scene investigators, paleontologists study clues left behind. See firsthand what trackways—fossilized footprints—can tell them about dinosaur behavior.



Observe a Dinosaur

Ever wish you could watch a dinosaur in action? Investigate modern birds for an insightful look at how ancient dinosaurs moved and behaved.



Dino Times! How Dinosaurs Lived

Travel to Liaoning, China, where a fossilized lakebed is providing scientists with the most complete picture to-date of what a dinosaur ecosystem probably looked like.



Fossilized Fashion: How Dinosaurs Looked

We know that some dinosaurs had fancy frills while others had sharp horns or pointy spikes. But why? Investigate the purpose of these and other dinosaur "fashions."


Hands-on Activity

Dinosaur Illustrations

Ankylosaurus, Barosaurus, Coelophysis—add to your dinosaur vocabulary with these 12 illustrations. Soon you'll be able to spot a Pachycephalosaurus from across the room.



Solve a Sedimentary Layers Puzzle

The history of life on Earth is recorded in the planet's rock layers. Try your hand at reconstructing geologic history with this fossil-filled puzzle.


Hands-on Activity

Make an Ecosystem Diorama

Now you can gaze at your favorite museum diorama anytime you want, night or day. Grab your crayons, and create a shoe-box replica of A Wading Bird Rookery, The Olympic Rain Forest, or A Giant Cactus Forest.



Flesh Out a Fossil

Discover how artists bring dinosaur skeletons to life with skin, feathers, and other features. Then try to create your own lifelike Velociraptor from a skeletal drawing.



Light and Dark in the Sea

Only the top 200 meters (656 feet) of the ocean get enough light to support plants. Below 1,000 meters (3,281 feet), there's complete darkness. So how do organisms on the sea floor find food?


American Museum of Natural History

Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192
Phone: 212-769-5100

Open daily from 10 am-5:45 pm
except on Thanksgiving and Christmas
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