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Grades 6-8

paige_shell_spurling1

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

The Invincible Cockroach

When this 12-year-old from New York came face to face with a house full of cockroaches, he didn't run away. Instead, he got the bug to learn more about these virtually indestructible creatures.

Red Frog

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Poison-Dart Frogs: Nature's Touch-Me-Nots

For centuries, Latin America's poison-dart frogs have helped hunters capture their prey. Today, they're also helping scientists combat disease. Take a close (safe!) look at these vividly colored frogs with this 15-year-old student.

janet_ladder_medium

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Genetics: An Increasingly Important Field of Science

The work of Gregor Mendel—today known as the "Father of Genetics"—was disregarded by his fellow scientists. Learn how it was rediscovered decades later in this winning essay by a California teen.

Millipede

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Biodiversity in Arizona

It can seem that the desert ecosystem is devoid of much life. But this Arizona teen found biodiversity just by turning over a few ironwood tree trunks she found in the sand.

Southern Redback Vole

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Aspen: A Keystone Species

By keeping a nature journal, this 16-year-old from Colorado quickly saw how aspens support and sustain biodiversity. Learn more about the most widely distributed tree species in North America.

Killdeer

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Habitat Variety and Bird Abundance

The one constant in this world is change. Watch Lake Wildwood cycle from man-made lake to lakebed mudflats to marsh and finally back to lake with this 18-year-old from Georgia.

wolves

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

The Big Chill: Calming Signals Among Wolves

Wolves have long been the favorite animal of this eighth-grader from Illinois. Learn how she turned her interest into an insightful experiment about how wolves calm and comfort each other.

gaurav_crabsketch

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Fiddler on the Marsh

Fiddler crabs never stray far from their burrow. That's why they will do anything to avoid getting caught and measured, as this ninth-grader from Virginia found out.

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