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Grades 6-8

Slowing-the-Flow

Hands-on Activity

Slowing the Flow

All mammals—dogs, sea lions, and even you—have an adaptation for surviving in cold water. Take the plunge, and learn why the mammalian diving reflex is your cold-water friend.

Test-Density-with-a-Supersaturated-Solution

Hands-on Activity

Test Density with a Supersaturated Solution

You know that oil and water don't mix, but what about saltwater and freshwater? Find out firsthand with this kid-friendly experiment that examines both salinity and density. 

Reference List

Ocean Books

Explore the ocean's depths. Make your own diving bird mobile or Treasure Island map. Discover what sharks eat—and how it tastes. And set your mind afloat with these 12 kid-friendly books.

Space Weather

Science Bulletin

Space Weather: Storms from the Sun

Once upon a time, back in the twentieth century, the weather was straightforward: it rained or snowed, skies were sunny or cloudy. However, in the twenty-first century—the era of globalization and digitalization—a whole new kind weather is critical to consider: space weather.
Space weather is direct product of our local star, the Sun. The Sun continuously sheds its skin, blowing a fierce wind of charged particles in all directions, including Earth's. From time to time, storms on the Sun's surface—solar flares, coronal mass ejections—toss off added masses of energy and ions. When that turbulence slams into Earth, it produces space weather. The consequences can be spectacular, from colorful auroras to satellite, power and communications failures.
Space weather isn't new: the Sun has buffeted Earth with solar particles since the planet first formed. What has changed is society. This feature reveals how our increasing use of satellite technology has made us vulnerable to solar storms, and how solar scientists—"space weathermen"—are learning how to predict and forecast the Sun's activity.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. Find out more about Science Bulletins at http://www.amnh.org/sciencebulletins/.

cartesian divers_thumb

Classroom Activity, Hands-on Activity

Cartesian Diver

In this hands-on experiment, students create a neutrally buoyant "diver" and then observe the effects of increased water pressure.

donald4

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Bobwhite Quail Decline in Texas

2003 Young Naturalist Award-winning essay - Why was this 11th-grader from Texas stopping at every mile marker along the road and randomly tossing a hula hoop over his shoulder? To further science, of course! 

Buried-Bones

Hands-on Activity

Buried Bones

The next time you have chicken, don't throw out the bones—bury them in plaster of Paris. Then, scrape by scrape, see firsthand the challenges archaeologists face when excavating fossils.

Make-Your-Own-Einstein-Stationery

Hands-on Activity

Make Your Own Einstein Stationery

Don't just jot down your notes and ideas on plain paper. Showcase them alongside the musings and insights of Albert Einstein with these colorful, ready-to-print PDF stationery files.

Journey-to-the-Bottom-of-the-Sea

Game

Journey to the Bottom of the Sea

Did you know sound moves five times faster in water than in air? Or that cleaner fish have "cleaning stations" where they remove parasites? Deepen your knowledge with this ocean life challenge. 

Make-Your-Own-Marine-Biology-Stationery

Hands-on Activity

Make Your Own Marine Biology Stationery

Hide your notes in seaweed, send a deep-sea snapshot, or let an cockeyed squid deliver your message. Just add your name and address to these colorful stationery files.

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