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Grades 6-8

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Activity

Living Large

Sauropods dominated the Earth for 140 million years. How did they reach their massive sizes? What did they look like, how did they move, and what did they eat? Enter the lab to discover the answer first hand. 

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Interactive

Are YOU cut out for Mars?

Do you have what it takes to go on a space mission to the Red Planet? Take this quiz to find out! 

Interactive

Interactive: A Hotspot Trail

Yellowstone National Park lies above a stationary hotspot deep in Earth's mantle. See how previous volcanic eruptions of the hotspot have left a trail of calderas that ends, at the moment, with Yellowstone.

sandyhook

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

A Day at the (Barrier) Beach: My Expedition to Sandy Hook

Which has more oxygen: ocean water that has been aerated by turbulence, or bay water that has been fed by oxygen-producing plants? This ninth-grader from New Jersey learns that getting the answer is not all that easy!

mineral

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

An Essential Mineral

At 1,292 feet (394 meters) below sea level, the Dead Sea is the lowest point on Earth. But it's not the depth but the sea's saltiness that buoyed the imagination of this seventh-grader from New York.

birding

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Birding Sector 7

Set your alarm for 2 a.m., and trek along with this 11th-grader from Pennsylvania on the 102nd Christmas Bird Count. You'll start the day at Mingo Creek County Park. Be sure to wear a hat!

bog

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Bog Trotting

What turns a pond into an acid, waterlogged peat bog? Poor drainage and thousands of years, for starters. Go bog trotting with this eighth-grader from New Hampshire to learn more about the process.

woodlot

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Exploring a Woodlot's Ecosystem

Chances are you've heard the saying "There's no such thing as a free lunch." But did you know that it's one of fundamental laws of ecology? Explore all four with this tenth-grader from Wisconsin.

wetlands

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

How Do Humans and Plants Interact in Tidal Wetlands?

How is cordgrass able to survive the high salinity of a marsh when other plants can't? An amazing adaptation that lets it secrete excess salt, as this ninth-grader from Virginia discovered.

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