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Grades 6-8

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Activity

Simple Submarine

Plop, plop. Fizz, fizz. Dive, dive. Build your own mini submarines for a deeper look at how they work. No expensive supplies required—just Alka Seltser tablets and household objects.

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Classroom Activity

Functions of Feathers

Feathers serve many purposes, only one of which is flight. Examine their contours along with down feathers, semiplumes, and bristles.

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Classroom Activity

Seeing the Light

This simple experiment eases the task of understanding daily and seasonal cycles of day and night. See firsthand why the length of daylight changes along with your location on Earth.

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Classroom Activity

Blindfolded Walk

Without your eyes to guide—and possibly distract—you, what would you notice that you otherwise might not have? Enlist the help of a few friends, and find out.

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Activity

Site Report

Not sure how to describe your field site? This one-page site report will help you note the important details, from area and average elevation to human-made and natural topography.

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Article

Responsible Collecting

Collecting specimens is necessary for studying and documenting new species—making responsible collecting all the more important. Find out how you can practice it.

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Article

Collecting Plants

The New York Botanical Garden has plant specimens that date back to the Lewis and Clark expedition of 1804-1806. What better place to learn how to protect and store your botanical treasures?

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Classroom Activity

Antarctic Weather Stations

In Antarctica, scientists often have trouble measuring katabatic winds, which are so strong they can knock down the instruments. Discover for yourself why Antarctica is the windiest place on Earth.

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Classroom Activity

Relative Speed of Dinosaurs

Put your scientific skills to the test to see if you can figure out tell by their footprints if dinosaurs were walking, trotting, or running. 

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Classroom Activity

Create a Timeline of Earth

Did you know Stegosaurus became extinct 66 million years before T. rex walked the Earth? Explore the planet's diverse eras and periods.

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American Museum of Natural History

Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192
Phone: 212-769-5100

Open daily from 10 am - 5:45 pm
except on Thanksgiving and Christmas
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