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Grades 6-8

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Great White South by Herbert G. Ponting

Ponting is one of the best photographers to have documented Antarctica. He was also a fine travel writer. Read an excerpt from his account of traveling with Robert Falcon Scott on his last expedition.

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Excerpt: The Last March by Robert Falcon Scott

In November 1911, Robert Falcon Scott set out for the South Pole, hoping to be first. After the disappointment of coming in second, Scott tried to return to his ship. Read excerpts from his diary.

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The Voyage of the James Caird

Just one day away from Antarctica, Shackleton's ship was crushed and destroyed. Yet his ingenuity and bravery helped save the crew. Read about his 800-mile voyage in a lifeboat to go find help.

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Crevasses by Edmund Hillary

Along with being one of the first two men to scale Everest, Hillary also was a noted Antarctic explorer. Experience a trek across a band of crevasses near the South Pole with his firsthand account.

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At the Pole by Roald Amundsen

As a child, Amundsen dreamed of exploring the North Pole. Yet it is his discovery of the South Pole for which he is best known. Read Amundsen's exciting account of his groundbreaking expedition.

Brain-Power

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Brain Power

How quickly do you see and how well do you remember? Play these games to find out — and then use them to train your brain to perform better.

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The Formation of the Solar System

About 4.6 billion years ago, our solar system came into being. This comic strip explains the processes that led to the creation of the planets and the asteroid belt. 

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Cosmic Chemistry

What happened after the Big Bang? This comic strip explains the interactions that lead to the creation of stars, planetary nebulas, and supernovas. 

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Cosmic Chemistry

What happened after the Big Bang? This comic strip explains the interactions that lead to the creation of stars, planetary nebulas, and supernovas. 

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