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Grades 9-12

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Classroom Activity, Hands-on Activity

Just Add Water!

Give your class a tour of the diverse landscape of your own undersea realm!

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Hands-on Activity

That's Heavy!

This "heavy" experiment allows students to discover that salt water sinks in fresh water.

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Classroom Activity, Hands-on Activity

Water vs. Land

Brainstorm with your students a list of things that are possible in water that are not possible on land, and vice versa.

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Classroom Activity, Hands-on Activity

Be an Ocean Biodiversity Detective!

In this activity students will collect and closely observe specimens that have washed ashore to recognize different kinds of small ocean organisms.

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Science Bulletin

Reading the Rocks: The Search for Oil in ANWR

In 1980 an act of Congress set aside nearly 20 million acres of Alaska's North Slope tundra to create the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Less than 100 miles from the refuge is Prudhoe Bay, North America's largest oil field. Spread across what was once part of the largest intact wilderness area in the United States, Prudhoe Bay and its neighboring oil fields account for approximately 25 percent of U.S. domestic oil production.

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Science Bulletin

Derecho

On July 4, 1999, a rare and terrifying storm swept through the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in northern Minnesota. What began like a standard-issue thunderstorm soon turned strange and fierce, generating green clouds and strong winds reminiscent of a tornado. In fact, the storm was a cousin of the tornado: a derecho (pronounced "de-RAY-cho"), a type of storm so infrequent and fast-moving that only in recent years have meteorologists begun to understand how to recognize and forecast it

Space Weather

Science Bulletin

Space Weather: Storms from the Sun

Once upon a time, back in the twentieth century, the weather was straightforward: it rained or snowed, skies were sunny or cloudy. However, in the twenty-first century—the era of globalization and digitalization—a whole new kind weather is critical to consider: space weather.
Space weather is direct product of our local star, the Sun. The Sun continuously sheds its skin, blowing a fierce wind of charged particles in all directions, including Earth's. From time to time, storms on the Sun's surface—solar flares, coronal mass ejections—toss off added masses of energy and ions. When that turbulence slams into Earth, it produces space weather. The consequences can be spectacular, from colorful auroras to satellite, power and communications failures.
Space weather isn't new: the Sun has buffeted Earth with solar particles since the planet first formed. What has changed is society. This feature reveals how our increasing use of satellite technology has made us vulnerable to solar storms, and how solar scientists—"space weathermen"—are learning how to predict and forecast the Sun's activity.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. Find out more about Science Bulletins at http://www.amnh.org/sciencebulletins/.

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Classroom Activity, Hands-on Activity

Cartesian Diver

In this hands-on experiment, students create a neutrally buoyant "diver" and then observe the effects of increased water pressure.

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Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Bobwhite Quail Decline in Texas

2003 Young Naturalist Award-winning essay - Why was this 11th-grader from Texas stopping at every mile marker along the road and randomly tossing a hula hoop over his shoulder? To further science, of course! 

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