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Grades 9-12

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Article

Collecting Arthropod Specimens

What's the best way to catch an arthropod in the field—aerial netting, beating, or pitfall trapping? Actually, the answer is choosing the right collection method for your site's terrain and specimens.

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Article

Maintaining an Arthropod Collection

Because dragonfly wings tend to lose their iridescence soon after they are killed, hazardous chemicals are sometimes used to "fix" the colors before they fade. But there are safer alternatives.

Kefyn Catley

Article

Sorting Arthropods for Identification

Identifying arthropods is a challenge—even for someone who spends his days identifying Australian ground spiders at the museum. Get tips for making the sorting process easier.

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Article

Investigating Plant-Arthropod Interactions

In her search for answers, this doctoral candidate mostly came up with more questions—a result that made her happy. Learn why she thinks the best part of discovery is following a trail of questions.

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Article

Saving El Imposible: A Biodiversity Puzzle

Journey to El Salvador for a visit to El Imposible, where you have to go on horseback or foot to see the entire forest. This national park has been called the "Jewel of Central America."

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Article, Science Bulletins

The Shining Star of South African Astronomy

On cloudless, moonless nights, the stars are so bright over the remote village of Sutherland, South Africa, that a person can walk by starlight alone. Learn more about the village’s Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

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Article

Essay: The Success of Failed Stars

Scientists have been studying brown dwarfs, or failed stars, for nearly a century. What have they learned? And what answers are they still seeking about these objects stuck somewhere between stars and planets?

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Article

Essay: Will Dark Energy Please Come to Light?

Two teams working independently in 1998 came to the same conclusion: An invisible force, one that seems to act opposite gravity, is separating the matter in space at an increasing pace. Find out more about their “jaw-dropping” discovery.

Ray

Article

Essay: Waiting for Gravity at LIGO

If LIGO regularly registers gravitational waves, it will more than vindicate Einstein. The observatory may help answer pressing questions about the cosmos’s biggest mysteries, among them black holes, dark matter, and the Big Bang.

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Article

Essay: A Rogue's Gallery of Gravity-Makers

Anything with an accelerating mass has a gravitational effect — an atomic bomb, a spinning aircraft carrier, even you. Learn more about these ripples in space and how LIGO is designed to capture the biggest gravitational waves.

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