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Grades 9-12

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Article: Earth Without Oxygen

Where would the world be without oxygen? While it's hard to imagine an Earth without it, for nearly the first half of the planet's 4.5-billion-year history, Earth had no oxygen gas as part of its atmosphere.

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Article: Life Makes a Mark

One of the biggest forces that's shaped planet Earth over time is microscopic in size. Explore the global impact of microbes.

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Ghosts of Tsunamis Past

By unearthing sediment deposits tsunamis leave behind, scientists can study the waves' origins, extent, and frequency — and identify locations that have the geological apparatus to produce a tsunami, but haven't in written history.

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From Math to Maps

A tsunami hasn't affected the Pacific Northwest coast since 1964, yet bright-blue metal signs warning of them dot coastal streets. Find out why scientists are certain these communities are at risk.

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Fear the Future Tsunami?

Why did Hawaiian officials evacuate Hilo Bay in 1986 after a 7.7 earthquake but call off an evacuation in 2003 after a 7.8 one? The answer is DART. Learn more.

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Article: When Is "Wild" Actually "Feral"?

The takhi is the only true wild horse left in the world. The so-called "wild" horses that abound in Australia and North America are actually feral. Find out what it means when a domestic animal becomes feral. 

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Article: The Wild Horse Returns to Mongolia

Takhi horses became extinct in the wild in the late 1960s — but since 1997 they have been successfully breeding in the wild. Learn about the efforts behind this successful reintroduction. 

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Article: The Horse in Mongolian Culture

Take a look at Mongolia's takhi and discover how an Asian empire was won on horseback — and how Mongolia came to be known as the land of the horse. 

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In a Future Ocean, It Takes a Thick Skin

The next time you pry a clamshell or crack a lobster claw for dinner, pay a small homage. For many ocean creatures with hard shells, growing that armor is taking more effort than ever. Find out why.

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