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Grades 9-12



Species and Sprawl: Wood Turtles

See how scientists are using radio telemetry to gain a clearer picture of how much and what kind of space wood turtles need to survive.



Article: The Wild Horse, Yesterday and Today

Modern horses are part of the family Equidae. The fossil history of Equidae is well documented, but new evidence about its evolutionary history — and new interpretations of it — continue to accumulate. 

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Essay: Stars in Exquisite Accuracy

There’s only one star that astronomers have a firm grasp on: the Sun. Fundamental facts about other stars remain elusive. Find out how a powerful interferometer atop Mount Wilson in Southern California hopes to change that.



Article: GRACE Watches Earth's Water

Earth's water is in constant motion. It cycles through the planet's atmosphere, surface, and depths. This water cycle is fundamental to Earth’s climate — and is being dramatically affected by global warming.



In a Future Ocean, It Takes a Thick Skin

The next time you pry a clamshell or crack a lobster claw for dinner, pay a small homage. For many ocean creatures with hard shells, growing that armor is taking more effort than ever. Find out why.



Shaping a Continent: Version 1.0

Discover how scientists are now marrying traditional fieldwork with cutting-edge computer modeling to produce the first animated, theoretical picture of the Basin and Range Province's geological evolution.



Article: Carbon Sinks and Carbon Bombs

Scott Goetz has studied the boreal forest of Alaska for more than two decades, but year by year, the landscape is becoming less familiar to him. See how climate change is affecting the forest — and how the forest, in turn, may be influencing climate.



Article: Understanding a Marine Wilderness (in Parts)

Just like we have official wilderness areas on land, some people think we need them in the marine realm. Consider the need for vast stretches of coral reefs, underwater lawns of seagrass, and miles of open ocean.



Article: Follow the Magma

In 1669, the fastest and largest lava flow documented for Mount Etna on the island of Sicily killed most of Catania's 20,000 residents and destroyed much of the city. Why are scientists now watching Etna more than any other volcano in Europe? Find out.



Article: Marine Reserves—Living Local

Fishing supports residents all over the 700 Bahamian islands, but even more so in the less-accessible “Out Islands” like the Exumas. What does it mean for locals when their home becomes a "no-take" marine protected area? Find out.


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