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Grades 9-12

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Article: Zircons Recast Earth's Earliest Era

Rocks older than 4 billion years are not available to study, making the first 500 million years of Earth's history particularly mysterious. But cutting-edge techniques are now allowing geologists to study survivors of Earth's early era.

Article

The Sorry Story of Georges Bank

Find out why this huge shoal between Massachusetts' Cape Cod and Nova Scotia's Cape Sable Island is one of the world's most important fishing resources — and why it's now at risk.

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Article, Science Bulletins

Essay: Chasing Invaders on a Water Planet

Water bodies on our planet form a network, which aquatic species migrate over evolutionary time as needed or by accident. Find out how Homo sapiens have dramatically changed and accelerated this process.

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Article

From Goo to Zoo

Meet a deep-sea ecologist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute who has pioneered the use of submersible robots to study jellyfish and other gelatinous invertebrates in their native deep-sea environment.

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Article

A Simple Plan for Supremacy

Only in recent years have marine biologists come to grasp the astonishing abundance of gelatinous animals in the world's waters. Discover how that knowledge is helping them better understand how ocean food webs work.

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Article

How the Jelly Got Its Glow

To truly understand the deep sea, scientists need to turn off the lights on their submersible vehicles. Then they can see the ghostly blue flickers of bioluminescence produced by virtually every organism of the deep.

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Article

Welcome to the Subfamily

Meet "Big Red," a new species of jellyfish that is bulbous, dusky red, and huge, nearly one meter (about three feet) in diameter, with several fleshy arms instead of tentacles, like a balloon with greedy fingers.

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Observing Jellies

Long ago, people studied jellies by peering over the side of a boat and drawing the creatures as they bobbed nearby. See how much has changed since the 1800s.

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Article

In a Future Ocean, It Takes a Thick Skin

The next time you pry a clamshell or crack a lobster claw for dinner, pay a small homage. For many ocean creatures with hard shells, growing that armor is taking more effort than ever. Find out why.

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