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Grades 9-12

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Article

Ghosts of Tsunamis Past

By unearthing sediment deposits tsunamis leave behind, scientists can study the waves' origins, extent, and frequency — and identify locations that have the geological apparatus to produce a tsunami, but haven't in written history.

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From Math to Maps

A tsunami hasn't affected the Pacific Northwest coast since 1964, yet bright-blue metal signs warning of them dot coastal streets. Find out why scientists are certain these communities are at risk.

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Fear the Future Tsunami?

Why did Hawaiian officials evacuate Hilo Bay in 1986 after a 7.7 earthquake but call off an evacuation in 2003 after a 7.8 one? The answer is DART. Learn more.

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In a Future Ocean, It Takes a Thick Skin

The next time you pry a clamshell or crack a lobster claw for dinner, pay a small homage. For many ocean creatures with hard shells, growing that armor is taking more effort than ever. Find out why.

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Article: Carbon Sinks and Carbon Bombs

Scott Goetz has studied the boreal forest of Alaska for more than two decades, but year by year, the landscape is becoming less familiar to him. See how climate change is affecting the forest — and how the forest, in turn, may be influencing climate.

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Elephants Return to the Forest

Unlike most zoo-raised or domestic species, Asian elephants have never been selectively bred, so they remain genetically wild. See how this helps with forest reintroduction efforts. 

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The Burdens of a Beast

Unlike people in Africa, who kept their distance from elephants except to hunt them, people in Asia have lived closely with elephants since at least 2000 B.C. Take a closer look at the underlying bond that exists today. 

mahout&elephant2

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Asian Elephants: Threats and Solutions

The Asian elephant once roamed from the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in western Asia as far east as China's Yangtze River. Take a closer look at this now highly endangered species. 

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