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Grades 9-12

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Article

Welcome to the Subfamily

Meet "Big Red," a new species of jellyfish that is bulbous, dusky red, and huge, nearly one meter (about three feet) in diameter, with several fleshy arms instead of tentacles, like a balloon with greedy fingers.

Interactive

Observing Jellies

Long ago, people studied jellies by peering over the side of a boat and drawing the creatures as they bobbed nearby. See how much has changed since the 1800s.

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Elephants Return to the Forest

Unlike most zoo-raised or domestic species, Asian elephants have never been selectively bred, so they remain genetically wild. See how this helps with forest reintroduction efforts. 

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The Burdens of a Beast

Unlike people in Africa, who kept their distance from elephants except to hunt them, people in Asia have lived closely with elephants since at least 2000 B.C. Take a closer look at the underlying bond that exists today. 

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Article: Lemurs in Madagascar—Now

The ring-tailed lemurs that romp around the research camp at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve in southwest Madagascar spend plenty of time behaving badly. The same isn't true for their counterparts in the wild.

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Asian Elephants: Threats and Solutions

The Asian elephant once roamed from the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in western Asia as far east as China's Yangtze River. Take a closer look at this now highly endangered species. 

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Article: Lemurs in Madagascar—Then

The lemurs of Madagascar, the most diverse group of primates in the world, had even more members in their ranks before humans first arrived on the island two millennia ago — 16 of the perhaps 70 species aren’t around anymore.

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The Past and Future Vigor of an Urban River

In April 1609, English explorer Henry Hudson set sail in his ship the Half Moon in search of a Northwest Passage to the Pacific Ocean. While he didn't find it, he did navigate the Bronx River. See how it's changed in the centuries since Hudson's voyage.

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The Uncommon Aye-Aye: An Interview with Eleanor Sterling

The dozens of diverse lemur species on Madagascar are a motley crew. Still, none look and act quite like the aye-aye. Take a closer look at this lemur, which is considered one of the world's strangest animals altogether.

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