Grades 9-12

Living at the Pole by Paul Siple

Article

Living at the Pole by Paul Siple

Siple's Antarctic trips are legendary. At 10, he was selected in a nationwide Boy Scout search to travel there. Several decades later, he was part of the first group to winter over at the South Pole.

Studying Polar Climate

Article

Studying Polar Climate

Talk about the force of gravity—Antarctica's powerful katabatic winds thunder down from the high polar plateau to the coast, creating wind speeds that typically exceed 100 mph every winter month.

The Circle of the Food Chain and Decomposition

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

The Circle of the Food Chain and Decomposition

This seventh-grader from Mississippi asked, when it comes to planting a garden, isn't dirt just dirt? Find out what she learned by digging into the study of decomposition and making compost.

Seeing Double: An Exhibit on Cloning

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Seeing Double: An Exhibit on Cloning

Cloning was once considered scientifically impossible. And then came Dolly, the sheep that made headlines around the world. Tour the science of cloning with this 11th-grader from New Jersey.

Agricultural Genetic Engineering

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Agricultural Genetic Engineering

Are the tomatoes, cheese, and carrots on your table genetically engineered? And if so, why should you care? Wander the aisles of this engaging exhibit, imagined by a 10th-grader from Rhode Island.

Antarctica's Early Explorers

Article

Antarctica's Early Explorers

The first time Manahan walked into Scott's primitive 1902 hut, still sitting out on the Antarctic ice, he couldn't help but see how similar their work was despite their very different base camps.

Microorganisms in Antarctic Seas

Article

Microorganisms in Antarctic Seas

During the winter, the sea ice off Antarctica covers an area so big that it's actually the largest continuous habitat on Earth. The algae that live there produce 25 percent of all oxygen on the planet.

Studying Antarctica's Marine Organisms

Article

Studying Antarctica's Marine Organisms

Antarctica's water is so clear that organisms have problems finding food. "It's like parents having to tell their young, 'We're not going to be able to feed you until Christmas, so hold your breath,'" says Donal Manahan.

Survival in the Northeast Wilderness

Young Naturalist Awards Essay

Survival in the Northeast Wilderness

2003 Young Naturalist Award-winning essay - Squirrels aren't the only ones who can make a meal of acorns. You could, too, if you were lost in the woods without food. Get a lesson in wilderness survival from this Rhode Island ninth-grader.

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Science Bulletin

Stem Cells: Developing New Cures

Although stem cells hold promise as direct therapy for human diseases, many researchers are even more enthusiastic about the opportunity to use stem cells to study disease fundamentals. Learn how clinicians and researchers are involving diabetes patients in the search for a cure by developing new stem cell lines from their DNA.

Parts of an Insect (Grasshopper)

Diagram

Parts of an Insect (Grasshopper)

The tibia's connected to the femur; the head's connected to the prothorax ... Learn the parts that make up an insect with this illustrated guide to a grasshopper.

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