Shortcut Navigation:

Grades 9-12

Brown Dwarfs: Tail End of the Stars

Science Bulletin

Brown Dwarfs: Tail End of the Stars

Journey to the heights of Mauna Kea in Hawaii where astronomers search for brown dwarfs, cosmic bodies that are not quite stars and not quite planets. These long-sought objects are still elusive and visible largely with advanced technologies such as the adaptive optics tools on the Keck II telescope.

The Expanding Universe

Science Bulletin

Our Expanding Universe

In 1998, astrophysicists discovered a baffling phenomenon: the Universe is expanding at an ever-faster rate. Either an enigmatic force called dark energy is to blameor a reworking of gravitational theory is in order. In this new Science Bulletins video, watch a Fermilab team assemble the Dark Energy Camera, a device that could finally solve this space-stretching mystery.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. Each Bulletin is produced by AMNHs curatorial and scientific staff and a team of video producers, designers, writers, and educators using state-of-the-art technologies such as high-definition video and 3-D computer graphics to present the latest research.

Geologist on Mars

Science Bulletin

Geologists on Mars

In March 2004, two NASA explorers discovered firm evidence that water once flowed on Mars—perhaps enough water to harbor life.

Jellies Down Deep New Thumbnail

Science Bulletin

Jellies Down Deep

This Bio Bulletin, which features spectacular underwater footage, follows scientists at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute as they retrieve jellies from the deep. For background information, educational resources, and more, visit Jellies Down Deep on the Science Bulletins Web site:http://www.amnh.org/sciencebulletins/.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History.

480x270

Science Bulletin

Learning From Lyme

Since its discovery in 1975, Lyme disease has become one of the most commonly reported diseases transmitted by insects, spiders or other arthropods. Declining biodiversity may be a contributing factor in the rise of Lyme disease in humans. Explore this unexpected consequence of human impact on animal habitats in this new Science Bulletins feature.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History.

480x270c

Science Bulletin

Surveying Vietnam

In recent years, scientists from around the world have turned to Vietnam in their search for new plant and animal species. Vietnam harbors an astonishing range of habitats, from rain forests and dry forests to mangroves and coral reefs. Scientific expeditions and surveys have discovered an amazing range of biodiversity. But even as this biodiversity is being revealed, it is coming under threat from development and human activity. Scientists now are racing to accomplish their studies in an effort to keep Vietnam's biological wealth from disappearing entirely.

480x270a

Science Bulletin

The Ecology of Climate Change

The boreal forest, which stretches across northern latitudes just south of the Arctic Circle, is a key region for studying climate change—and not just the impacts. Follow ecologists into Alaska's boreal forest to learn more in this new Science Bulletins video.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. Each Bulletin is produced by AMNHs curatorial and scientific staff and a team of video producers, designers, writers, and educators using state-of-the-art technologies such as high-definition video, data visualization, and 3-D computer graphics to present the latest research.

480x270a

Science Bulletin

Attachment Theory: Understanding the Essential Bond

In 1958, psychologist John Bowlby pioneered "attachment theory," the idea that the early bond between parent and child is critical to a child's emotional development. Since then, scientists have discovered that insecure attachment during formative years can significantly stress both the developing brain and body, resulting in long-term psychological and physical ailments. For example, low levels of attachment security have been linked to diminished levels of cortisol, a steroidal hormone released in response to stress that is critical in reducing inflammation in the body. Watch the latest Human Feature from the Museum's Science Bulletins program to see how recent studies are using cortisol levels as a marker to determine the success of early intervention in building stronger attachments between struggling parents and children. Visitors to AMNH may view the video in the Hall of Human Origins until January 2, 2012.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. Find out more about Science Bulletins at amnh.org/sciencebulletins/.

SELECT PAGE

American Museum of Natural History

Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192
Phone: 212-769-5100

Open daily from 10 am-5:45 pm
except on Thanksgiving and Christmas
Maps and Directions

Enlighten Your Inbox

Stay informed about Museum news and research, events, and more!