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Science Bulletin

Early Migration for Modern Humans

When did modern humans make their first appearance in Europe? A jawbone excavated in England and two molars found in southern Italy suggest that modern humans migrated northward thousands of years earlier than previously thought. These fossils were discovered and interpreted decades ago but recent analysis pushed back the age of the jawbone, while positively identifying the much-older molars as modern human. The latest Human Bulletin from the Museum's Science Bulletins program explains how this new data suggests a much longer period of interaction between humans and Neanderthals in northern Europe. Visitors to AMNH may view the video in the Hall of Human Origins until February 9, 2012. 
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. Find out more about Science Bulletins at http://www.amnh.org/sciencebulletins/.

Science Bulletins: Gamers Model AIDS-Related Protein FINAL

Science Bulletin

Gamers Model AIDS-Related Protein

The structure of a protein controlling growth in the HIV virus eluded scientists for over a decade. Online gamers used Foldit, a competitive protein-modeling environment developed by the University of Washington's Center for Game Science, to successfully model the protein in only three weeks. In the latest Human News from the Museum's Science Bulletins program, learn how game players' manipulation of protein models can help scientists fight lethal viruses. View the story in AMNH's Hall of Human Origins until December 7, 2011 or online. For background information, educational resources, and more, visit Gamers Model AIDS-Related Protein on the Science Bulletins Web site at http://www.amnh.org/sciencebulletins/.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History.

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Science Bulletin

Have Humans Adapted to the Western Diet?

Italian scientists report that people in Western countries lack the diversity of stomach bacteria found in rural villagers in Africa. The implication is that our bodies are better suited to the diets of our ancestors than the modern Western diet.

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Science Bulletin

How Does Reading Change the Brain?

A recent study led by neuroscientists at France's National Institute of Health and Medical Research has found that learning to read—no matter at what age—reorganizes the brain's neural networks. What's more, their findings suggest that literacy may improve the ability to understand spoken language.

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