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Grades 9-12

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Article

Plant/Arthropod Interactions

Not all arthropods are equal in the eyes of plants. To attract helpful ones and fend off harmful ones, plants use their important chemical and mechanical attributes.

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Article

Living and Working in Antarctica Safely

Each year, more than 1,000 researchers and support staff travel to Antarctica. It's Ferris's job to make sure that each one has safety training, plus the right supplies and transportation.

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Article

Who Are the Plants?

There are 10 divisions in the plant kingdom. The largest order, flowering plants, has 235,000 species. The smallest, gingkoes, has a single species. Learn more about the orders in the kingdom Plantae.

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Diagram

Types of Compound Leaves

Is your compound leaf pinnate or palmate? And if it's pinnate, is it pinnate odd, pinnate even, or twice pinnate? Find the answers easily with this illustrated guide.

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Diagram

Types of Antennae

Arthropods may use antennae to touch, smell, and even hear the world. But that doesn't mean that all of these appendages look the same. From featherlike to clubbed, see the wide variety of antennae.

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Image Gallery

Arthropod Morphology

From metamorphosis and types of antennae to the parts of a spider and a grasshopper, take an illustrated look at arthropod morphology with this collection of guides.

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Article

Some Background on Antarctica

Despite extremely harsh conditions, about 3,500 people go to work in Antarctica each year. And the number of research applications is on the rise. What, exactly, is so alluring about Antarctica?

Keeping a journal

Article

Letter from Stephanie: Keeping a Journal

"Keeping a good journal is kind of like having an extra brain," says this glacial geologist. Find out what Shipp records in her second brain when she's conducting field research in Antarctica. 

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Article

Day & Night Cycles

In Antarctica, the Sun never sets during the summer or rises during the winter. But do you know why? Learn the answer from a researcher who summers in the land of constant daylight.

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Article

Katabatic Winds

While out at sea, Shipp's ship hit a windstorm that was nasty by anyone's definition—wind speeds of 80 knots (70 mph). Learn why it's not uncommon for wind speeds to reach 200 mph in Antarctica.

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