Post-Secondary

Degree Program
Richard Gilder Graduate School
Ph.D. in Comparative Biology
Taking full advantage of the Museum’s unparalleled resources, this Ph.D. program - the first for any museum in the Western Hemisphere - has graduated doctoral students who have gone on to careers in academia, museum curation, government, industry, and the private sector.

 

Degree Program
Richard Gilder Graduate School
Master of Arts in Teaching
Learn to teach Earth and Space science in New York City through the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Urban Residency Program at the American Museum of Natural History; the first urban teacher residency program offered by a museum.




Fear the Future Tsunami?

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Fear the Future Tsunami?

Why did Hawaiian officials evacuate Hilo Bay in 1986 after a 7.7 earthquake but call off an evacuation in 2003 after a 7.8 one? The answer is DART. Learn more.

Article: Yellowstone National Park is a Volcano

Article

Article: Yellowstone National Park is a Volcano

More than three million visitors step onto this charged volcanic landscape every year. Yet the geologists that monitor it are unconcerned about a large, imminent eruption. Find out why.

Article: Signs of Restlessness

Article

Article: Signs of Restlessness

The magma chamber responsible for Yellowstone's volcanic activity is buried 8km beneath the surface. Find out how researchers monitor its geologic moves.

Article: Zircons Recast Earth's Earliest Era

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Article: Zircons Recast Earth's Earliest Era

Rocks older than 4 billion years are not available to study, making the first 500 million years of Earth's history particularly mysterious. But cutting-edge techniques are now allowing geologists to study survivors of Earth's early era.

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Diabetes in a Dish: Using Stem Cells to Study Disease

While technological advances are making it easier for the 21 million diabetics in the United States to manage healthy lives, diabetes is still a disease that requires vigilance. See how scientists are using stem cells to find a cure.

The Enigma of High Energy Cosmic Rays

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The Enigma of High Energy Cosmic Rays

In 1912, Viktor Hess took to the sky in a hot-air balloon and discovered a radioactive energy now called “cosmic rays.” Travel to Argentina to see how scientists now hope to discover at long last where the highest-energy cosmic rays are coming from.

Science Stays Alert, Part I: Birds Under Scrutiny

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Science Stays Alert, Part I: Birds Under Scrutiny

In a handful of cases, humans have contracted H5N1 from birds and then passed the virus to other humans. Even so, doctors and scientists are taking great pains to prepare for the possibility of such a pandemic.

Biodiversity Science in Vietnam

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Biodiversity Science in Vietnam

Vietnam harbors an astonishing range of habitats, from rain forests and dry forests to mangroves and coral reefs. It's also home to an unusually rich array of plants and animals. Find out why.

The Fate of a Frozen Land

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The Fate of a Frozen Land

Earth's ice sheets are rapidly losing volume as humans have warmed the Arctic by over 2 degrees Celsius in the past 50 years. Could Greenland really unfreeze? And what might happen if it does?

A Mountain Theory on the Rise

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A Mountain Theory on the Rise

Mount St. Elias, the third-highest peak in North America, is among the fastest growing ranges in the world, rising 3 to 4 millimeters a year. Find out what this natural laboratory is helping scientists learn about mountain building.

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