Post-Secondary

Degree Program
Richard Gilder Graduate School
Ph.D. in Comparative Biology
Taking full advantage of the Museum’s unparalleled resources, this Ph.D. program - the first for any museum in the Western Hemisphere - has graduated doctoral students who have gone on to careers in academia, museum curation, government, industry, and the private sector.

 

Degree Program
Richard Gilder Graduate School
Master of Arts in Teaching
Learn to teach Earth and Space science in New York City through the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Urban Residency Program at the American Museum of Natural History; the first urban teacher residency program offered by a museum.




Article: GRACE Watches Earth's Water

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Article: GRACE Watches Earth's Water

Earth's water is in constant motion. It cycles through the planet's atmosphere, surface, and depths. This water cycle is fundamental to Earth’s climate — and is being dramatically affected by global warming.

Article: Zircons Recast Earth's Earliest Era

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Article: Zircons Recast Earth's Earliest Era

Rocks older than 4 billion years are not available to study, making the first 500 million years of Earth's history particularly mysterious. But cutting-edge techniques are now allowing geologists to study survivors of Earth's early era.

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Diabetes in a Dish: Using Stem Cells to Study Disease

While technological advances are making it easier for the 21 million diabetics in the United States to manage healthy lives, diabetes is still a disease that requires vigilance. See how scientists are using stem cells to find a cure.

Biogeography Begets Biodiversity

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Biogeography Begets Biodiversity

Discover how the geological and climatic changes that have unfolded over millions of years in Vietnam have set the stage for an extraordinary richness of biodiversity.

Biodiversity in the Crossfire

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Biodiversity in the Crossfire

See how scientists are racing to reveal Vietnam's biological riches before many species and their habitats disappear from the country's landscape due to expanding development and human activity.

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The Sorry Story of Georges Bank

Find out why this huge shoal between Massachusetts' Cape Cod and Nova Scotia's Cape Sable Island is one of the world's most important fishing resources — and why it's now at risk.

Science Stays Alert, Part I: Birds Under Scrutiny

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Science Stays Alert, Part I: Birds Under Scrutiny

In a handful of cases, humans have contracted H5N1 from birds and then passed the virus to other humans. Even so, doctors and scientists are taking great pains to prepare for the possibility of such a pandemic.

The Enigma of High Energy Cosmic Rays

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The Enigma of High Energy Cosmic Rays

In 1912, Viktor Hess took to the sky in a hot-air balloon and discovered a radioactive energy now called “cosmic rays.” Travel to Argentina to see how scientists now hope to discover at long last where the highest-energy cosmic rays are coming from.

Biodiversity Science in Vietnam

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Biodiversity Science in Vietnam

Vietnam harbors an astonishing range of habitats, from rain forests and dry forests to mangroves and coral reefs. It's also home to an unusually rich array of plants and animals. Find out why.

The Fate of a Frozen Land

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The Fate of a Frozen Land

Earth's ice sheets are rapidly losing volume as humans have warmed the Arctic by over 2 degrees Celsius in the past 50 years. Could Greenland really unfreeze? And what might happen if it does?

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