Shortcut Navigation:

Post-Secondary

Impact! Tracking Near-Earth Asteroids?

Science Bulletin

Impact! Tracking Near-Earth Asteroids

Collisions between space objects are a vital part of the evolution of our Solar System. Most of Earth's impact craters have been wiped away due to plate tectonics, but evidence of such cosmic catastrophes, such as Arizona's 50,000-year-old meteor crater, do remain. When is Earth due for another major blast? Meet the professional and amateur astronomers who may be the first to know: first at LINEAR, a near-earth asteroid detection facility in New Mexico, and then at the Smithsonian's Minor Planet Center, where orbits of near-earth objects are tracked for possible hits and misses.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science
Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of
Education at the American Museum of Natural History. This visualization
was supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA).

Tsunami Science: Reducing the Risk

Science Bulletin

Tsunami Science: Reducing the Risk

The scientific data left in the wake of the horrific December 26, 2004 tsunami is proving invaluable to better prepare for future events. Meet the researchers at the crest of this relatively young science. Featured are the geologists, seismologists, and computer modelers of the U.S. Pacific Northwest, an area replete with geological and anthropological evidence of past tsunamis. Learn how the region is preparing for its inevitable next wave.

New Horizons Mission to Pluto

Science Bulletin

New Horizon's Mission to Pluto

Since its discovery in 1930, we've looked at Pluto as our solar system's ninth planet. But residing in the icy realm of the outer solar system, where the sun's brightness is less than 1/1000 of the brightness here on Earth, Pluto is nothing like the other planets of our solar system. It differs tremendously from the gas giants Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, but does not resemble the rocky terrestrial worlds Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars.

Our Moon

Science Bulletin

Our Moon

The peaceful glow of the moonlight in our sky belies a violent history. Evidence suggests that the Moon formed when a Mars-sized object collided with the young Earth, and detailed computer models show us how such an impact could form our lunar companion in just one month.
Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science
Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of
Education at the American Museum of Natural History. This visualization
was supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA).

CHARA array_2_crop.jpg

Essay

Essay: Stars in Exquisite Accuracy

There’s only one star that astronomers have a firm grasp on: the Sun. Fundamental facts about other stars remain elusive. Find out how a powerful interferometer atop Mount Wilson in Southern California hopes to change that.

hess.jpg

Article

The Enigma of High Energy Cosmic Rays

In 1912, Viktor Hess took to the sky in a hot-air balloon and discovered a radioactive energy now called “cosmic rays.” Travel to Argentina to see how scientists now hope to discover at long last where the highest-energy cosmic rays are coming from.

GRACE_NASA

Article

Article: GRACE Watches Earth's Water

Earth's water is in constant motion. It cycles through the planet's atmosphere, surface, and depths. This water cycle is fundamental to Earth’s climate — and is being dramatically affected by global warming.

mtndesert

Article

Shaping a Continent: Version 1.0

Discover how scientists are now marrying traditional fieldwork with cutting-edge computer modeling to produce the first animated, theoretical picture of the Basin and Range Province's geological evolution.

SELECT PAGE

American Museum of Natural History

Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192
Phone: 212-769-5100

Open daily from 10 am - 5:45 pm
except on Thanksgiving and Christmas
Maps and Directions

Enlighten Your Inbox

Stay informed about Museum news and research, events, and more!